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Katie Bunnell

Katie Bunnell

Katie Bunnell, All Makers Now? Conference Convenor and Chair for Materiality and Aesthetics Affiliation: Autonomatic Falmouth University Key words: materiality and aesthetics, design practices, democratising technology Biog: Katie Bunnell is a ceramic designer-maker, researcher and leader of the Autonomatic research group at Falmouth University. Katie has an MA in Ceramics and Glass from the Royal College of Art and completed a practice based PhD, “Integrating New Technologies into Ceramic Designer-Maker Practice” in 1998 and founded Autonomatic in 2003. Since then the group have established a reputation for practice-based research that explores the relationships between digital technologies and craft practices. The group consists of practitioner-researchers working in ceramics, metals, glass, textiles, wood and mixed media whose research is focussed on developing specialist digital craft skills and driven by the interests and needs of practices in the UK craft and designer-maker sector. Their work highlights the importance of specialist, high quality, small-scale production within the wider Digital Economy, creating a bridge between 20th century craft practices and 21st century manufacturing. The work of the group has featured in international public exhibitions and lectures, won significant national awards and prizes and influenced policy in the craft sector over the last 10 years. In 2013 HRH Prince Charles presented Autonomatic with the Craft Skills Spotlight Award in recognition of important work being done in digital skills across the sector. Their unique, open exploratory and hands on approach to working with digital tools has resulted in innovative processes and products and enabled them to develop new forms of collaborative and interdisciplinary...
Katie Bunnell

Katie Bunnell

Katie Bunnell, Andrew Smith and Oliver Hatfield Affiliation: Autonomatic, Falmouth University Key words: DIY CNC Tools, Expressive Mark Making, Ceramics Conference Activity: Workshop Friday 11th July Project summary: The Super Slip-Pi (sometimes affectionately known as the Toftomatic amongst ceramicists) is a digitally networked, computer numerically controlled machine for ceramic surface pattern decoration. Employing a Raspberry Pi, Arduino and Tiny G, Super Slip-Pi is a low cost digital system designed to provide an inspiring demonstration of the ways in which the internet and digital production can come together as part of a distributed production chain for artisan ceramics. The machine incorporates a digital  interface that enables users to create and upload imagery remotely via the web and aims to facilitate playful engagement in the production of ceramic tile designs. As a work in progress we invite conference participants to have a go and contribute their responses to it. So come to play! One question that arises from your project: What do Craft practitioners have to contribute to the development of digital tools and...
Hannah Maughan

Hannah Maughan

Hannah Maughan, All Makers Now? Conference Chair Affiliation: Falmouth University Key words:  Design, Embroidery, Community Conference Activity: Chair, Digital Making in Textiles, Thurs 10th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Hannah is a textile designer specialising in embroidery and mixed media. Her work ranges from the couture to the commercial and is represented by View Studio in London, with regular international sales to a variety of leading design companies within the fashion and interior industries. Since 2003 Hannah has worked as senior lecturer on the Textile Design programme, establishing the mixed media area. This focuses on engaging the students in the traditions and values of hand, machine stitch and fabric manipulation, with the emphasis on technical acumen and creative response to personalise and contemporise the discipline. This is also the ethos of her own research work which is currently focusing on digital embroidery. Hannah was a key player in establishing Hidden Art Cornwall at Falmouth, the first and only social franchise of the award winning designer-maker membership organisation, Hidden Art, which connected the Cornish creative design community to each other and the international design community and ran until 2009. In 2011 Hannah received the Falmouth Teaching Excellence Award, created by the institution to recognise exceptionally high quality teaching. This was in recognition of her overall engagement and commitment to her subject area and students.  This contribution was recognised nationally this year when Hannah was shortlisted for the Embroiderers’ Guild inaugural Beryl Dean Award for Teaching Excellence. For All Makers Now? Hannah will be chairing a session on Thurs pm on Digital Making in Textiles and exhibiting some of her...
Aaron Moore

Aaron Moore

Weave Side Table Aaron Moore, Independent Designer-Maker Conference activity: Pop Up Exhibition, Trelissick House Keywords: digital craft, furniture, open design. One of my areas of interest is the democratisation of design and manufacturing. My aim is to design objects and processes that enable small scale manufacturing to take place at a local level in order to reduce the carbon footprint of product distribution and empower and enable communities to become more self sufficient. I use a low cost self-made 3-axis CNC router, combined with open source software to make wooden components for furniture and household goods. A three axis machine however, is really only capable of producing 2 dimensional objects from flat sheets of material which have to ‘jigsaw’ together to become 3 dimensional. Like an origamist turning a flat sheet of paper into a representation of a 3 dimensional object, a great deal of skill is used but the paper is always present. As a consequence I have been exploring how the addition of a fourth rotary axis can change the aesthetic. In terms of technical complexity, adding a rotary axis to a 3 axis machine is relatively simple, and therefore still accessible to digital craft workers. It allows the machine to be used more like a lathe to shape all sides of the work-piece. The table exhibited is the result of an exploration of the capabilities afforded by the new axis and an interest in self-supporting structures i.e. those that are held together with no fixings other than the tension and compression forces within the structure itself. The interlocking components require very few manufacturing processes and only...
John Miller

John Miller

John Miller, All Makers Now? Conference Chair Affiliation: Mark Product, Cornwall Key words: Education, Making, Innovation Conference Activity: Chair, Digital Making in Education, Thurs 10th July Biog: John Miller is a director at MARK Product Ltd, the furniture company he co-founded in 2008. At that time John was Director of the School of Design at Falmouth University – MARK was a spin-out company from his work in building networks between Cornish manufacturers and the national furniture and interiors industry. Previously (2001-2005) John ran London’s Furniture Works industry resource centre, and established Metropolitan Works with its Digital Manufacturing Centre – a major investment in computer-aided manufacturing equipment. Now full time in business, John maintains a close interest in the education sector, contributing through external examining, the Design Guild Mark Committee of the Furniture Makers Company and is currently on the advisory board of the Creative Education Academies Trust. John co-founded ‘Design Ed in Cornwall’ in 2008 – a celebration of designing and making in Cornish schools, and continues to campaign for and promote the value of making in schools – most recently with the Making Designers exhibition in 2013. He sees the realm of digital production as both an opportunity and a threat for design education. On the one hand promising a democratisation and opening up of design and manufacturing – ‘all makers now’. On the other hand presenting a potential IT barrier to those young people motivated by using their whole hands rather than just their fingertips, and perhaps leading to a reduced engagement in ‘conventional’ craft and mass manufacturing processes One question that arises from your project: does...
Katharina Vones

Katharina Vones

Technological Microcosms – Considering Materiality, Aesthetic Coherence and Collaborative Practice in the Creation of Wearable Futures Katharina Vones  Affiliation: Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, University of Dundee Conference Activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Workshop Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition, Trelissick House Keywords: Smart Materials, Wearable Futures, Collaborative Practice Project summary: With the increased availability of digital tools to the contemporary craft practitioner providing an almost limitless potential for creation, the questions posed regarding the development of a coherent aesthetic language that combines both the handmade and the digitally crafted, have become progressively more pressing in the applied arts. To use these elements in such a way that they can be merged into an aesthetically articulate object combined with traditional craftsmanship is a challenge my research investigates. Visual and functional considerations are addressed together, thus developing material and technological solutions that constitute a cohesive part of the jewellery object. Exploring a holistic approach whereby material experimentation and digital production processes are used to facilitate the development of aesthetically integrated and humanised wearable technologies that supersede ideas of mere gadgetry is a focus of my practice. Through examining the notion that human biology is a part of material culture, my presentation investigates how recent developments in material science and wearable technologies can be viewed as contiguous rather than oppositional to the organic processes of the human body, bridging the gap between the craft practitioner and scientific discovery. The increasing availability of stimulus-reactive smart materials, in addition to the progressive miniaturisation of electromechanical components, has enabled the development of jewellery objects that are responsive to their environment, yet depend...
Dries Verbruggen

Dries Verbruggen

The digital craftsman and his tools Dries Verbruggen Affiliation: Unfold design studio, LUCA School of Arts, Design Academy Eindhoven Keywords: 3D Printing, Ceramics, Design, Tools, Open Source, Craft, Industry. Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Workshop Fri 11th July and Exhibit Project summary: From knife to hammer to 3d printer, the influence of tools on a design is not to be underestimated. In his essay “Tools,” originally published in 2000 in a book covering the work of LettError, Jan Middendorp argues for the importance of creating your own tools. He refers to the fact that a craftsman, the predecessor of the designer, was never completely satisfied with the tools that were sold in shops. Yet for a long time the instruments of production have been closed systems, discouraging appropriation. This is now changing. Following the personal computer and a range of digital advances, the advent of the personal digital fabricator has lowered the barrier into production and provoked a revival of the idea of “making your own things.” Unfold started to ‘customize’ their 3D printer into a clay printer. The open source hardware allows them – similar to traditional craftsmen – to create their own tools. By doing so they break away from a predetermined way of designing, dictated by the existing digital tools. As such, they can thoroughly intervene in the production process, and therefore also in the eventual design. Unfold’s 3d printer for ceramics not only harnesses the potential of new technology and materials but also projects the past history of specific techniques into the future. The printer has a great resonance with the way traditional potters...
Matthew Tyas

Matthew Tyas

Designing 21st Century Standard Ware: The Cultural Heritage of Leach and the Creative and Economic Benefits of Digital Technologies Matthew Tyas Affiliation: Falmouth University: Autonomatic and Leach Pottery, St Ives Keywords: Digital craft/making, Creative Practice, Studio Pottery Conference Activity: Presentation Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition, Trelissick House Project Summary: The Leach Pottery, established in 1920, is a stronghold of the UK Studio Pottery movement and synonymous with Bernard Leach’s unique and progressive assimilation of Eastern and Western pottery aesthetics and methods. This assimilation was expressed through his practice and writings, and further propagated through Leach Standard Ware: the Pottery’s domestic tableware that was produced over the period of about 40 years until 1979. In 2008, the Leach Pottery reopened as a museum and educational resource, and resumed the production of domestic pots in a new studio. This presentation explores opportunities presented by digital tools in the context of the Leach Pottery. Leach’s writing reveals a positive attitude to the relationship between technology and making: ‘The next step is to get rid of the idea of the machine as an enemy. The machine is an extension of the tool; the tool of the hand; the hand of the brain; and it is only the unfaithful use of machinery which we can attack’ (Leach 1928). The idea of using digital tools in a Leach Pottery context has been a difficult prospect for some potters, whose perception of ‘digital’ was associated with a lack of humanity, authenticity, and creativity. The project has challenged these perceptions and raises questions on a philosophical level with regard to setting new standards for contemporary studio...
Flemming Tvede Hansen, Martin Tamke

Flemming Tvede Hansen, Martin Tamke

Interfacing design and making of Ceramics,  Expansion of ceramics practice through technology Flemming Tvede Hansen, Ceramicist and Research Assistant Professor, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts – The School of Design. Martin Tamke, Architect and Associate Professor at CITA, Henrik Leander Evers, Research Assistant at CITA; The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts – The School of Architecture. Conference activity: Presentation Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Keywords: Ceramics, 3D digital interactive system, 3d printing. Project summary: This research investigates the relationship between crafting materiality and digital representation, and how experiential knowledge of crafts rooted in ceramics can be transformed and utilised in the use of digital technologies. Digital technology as 3D printing with ceramic allows a bridge from the digital design environment to fabrication. At the same time novel digital means can create new interfaces between the human, space and the material. Here advances in 3d motion capture technology and sensors allow capturing spatial hand gestures and body movement in real-time. Where technology often seems to take us away from material this approach enables the designer’s body to be once again involved in the making. This approach builds on McCullough’s (1998) idea about a close connection between digital work and a craft practice where tacit knowledge is involved (Dormer 1994). In this project a design experiment is used as a method of inquiry within reflective practice involving reflection on and through action (Schön 1993). The experiment in question investigates the idea of an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics and is working on two levels. One which has to...
Jeffrey Sarmiento, Erin Dickson

Jeffrey Sarmiento, Erin Dickson

Emotional Leak: Collaboration in Glass and Monumental 3D Printing Dr Jeffrey Sarmiento and Erin Dickson Affiliation: National Glass Centre at the University of Sunderland Keywords: waterjet, 3d printing, architectural phenomenology Project summary: “As practitioners we combine our knowledge of glass, print, architecture and digital fabrication. We share a common interest in the potential for extracting new meanings from historical objects, the phenomenology of architectural spaces and social contexts. We contribute to each other’s individual practice by finding new conceptual and physical solutions to site and material. Our approach is experimental, combining the craft of glassmaking with new technologies in 3d visualisation and fabrication. This has resulted in a number of proposals for site-specific artworks and commission. We will focus on a monumental scale glass sculpture, Emotional Leak, which utilises a waterjet cutter as a 3D printer in a sculptural response to the quirk in an architectural site. In this work, Dickson’s expertise in architecture, digital modelling and machining is combined with Sarmiento’s skills in glassmaking, particularly in printing, kilnforming, and construction. Together our work deepens the relationship between the digital and physical, pushing the physical boundaries of studio glass and digital technologies and providing new viewer experiences. Through combination of craft skills and technology we expand our ability to pack objects with information by encapsulating the image within the glass object and using aspects of data capture. These result in new ways to read the printed image as well as to visualise architectural phenomenology”. This paper will consider the impact of an approach to printing with glass that relies both on digital and craft skills. It describe how collaborative...
Kate Goldsworthy & Helen Paine

Kate Goldsworthy & Helen Paine

Laser Welding of Textiles: A Creative Approach to Technology Through a Reflective Craft Practice Kate Goldsworthy & Helen Paine Affiliation: University of the Arts London (UAL) & Royal College of Art (RCA) Keywords: technology, craft, textile finishing, laser welding, tacit knowledge, creative problem solving Conference activity: Presentation Project summary: In an increasingly digital age of manufacture the role of the craft practitioner and particularly hand making processes has had to be reconsidered. There are those that would argue the depletion of goods made by hand simply negates the need for making skills in the development of new products; however, there is an emerging argument that places more value in the potential benefit of craft practice, and particularly making, to bridge between scientific knowledge and the needs of industry. This paper calls upon the research of Dr. Kate Goldsworthy and Helen Paine, who have utilised laser-welding equipment, to explore the benefits of a ‘craft approach’ in assisting the development of an emerging technology, for decorative and functional textile finishing applications. Goldsworthy first worked with the technology in 2008 during her doctoral research, and has used it to develop unique surface finishes for textiles that preserve material purity and can be recycled within a closed-loop system. The inventors of the technology, TWI, fund Paine’s current doctoral research, and wrote the original brief for the project that is essentially technology driven; from which Paine has chosen to investigate new aesthetic and functional opportunities for stretch textiles offered by the equipment. Despite the disparate contexts for the research of Goldsworthy and Paine, their shared background in textile design has led them both to follow a...
Justin Novak

Justin Novak

DARWIN / The Designer Toy Platform as a Means of Academic Inquiry Justin Novak Affiliation: Centre for Applied Art and Material Production (CAAMP) Emily Carr University of Art & Design, Vancouver, Canada Keywords: Designer Toys, Ceramics, Illustration. Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Pop Up ExhibitionTrelissick House. Collaborating Artists: Atafeh Baradaran, Amelia Butcher, Nomi Chi, Hyun Chung, M.J. Hur, Ainsley Jasper, Justin Novak, Philip Robbins, Michael Salter, Patrick Wong Project summary: Collaboratively designed by students and the faculty of Illustration program at Emily Carr University, the Darwin project employs industrial ceramic processes but adopts the aesthetics and collaborative dynamics of the explosive “Urban Vinyl” subculture. As a generic figurative form that lacks detail and invites transformation through surface design, Darwin appropriates the strategy of the designer toy “platform”, popularised by Toy2R’s Qee and KidRobot’s Dunny. The project involves glazed ceramic “blanks” that are produced as identical multiples that are then offered to collaborators, each of whom provide a unique surface pattern to create a customised version of the product. Like his namesake, Darwin is all about adaptation, and offers an ideal opportunity for collaborative experimentation. Regardless of the creator’s experience with ceramic media, any digitised image can be applied and kiln-fired onto the form with specialised ceramic decals. Unlike the vinyl toys that inspired them, the Darwin figures are conceived and presented primarily as a form of academic inquiry – an invitation to investigate our adaptive and/or conditional nature. The Darwin project aims to investigate how the collective and potentially disparate concerns of a community might be manifested symbolically or allegorically. This research project explores the ability of a collection...
Joanne McCallum

Joanne McCallum

(re)crafting basketry: exploring the relationship between traditional techniques and digital design Joanne McCallum, Independent Maker Keywords: Basketry, craft, digital design Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project Summary: I see patterns when I understand things. I see the world as visual patterns of connectivity. I think pattern recognition is a fundamental part of the creative mind… I see everything as patterns. – Richard Saul Wurman (Architect and Information Architect) I am currently applying to undertake a practice-led PhD exploring the role of Japanese bamboo basketry as an informative miniature for digital design, manifesting nature and the value of hand-hewn craft. As a precursor to this work I am considering the pattern relationships between traditional basketry and digital design. At present, I am examining and documenting a basket from the British Museum collection in order to create a hybrid-craft prototype, via 3d modelling software and digital printing technology. I will present this project at All Makers Now under the theme Enhancing the Object, in order to: highlight interdisciplinary collaborative practices that have enabled successful outcomes; and develop a digitally enhanced object in the context of a museum. Late last year I visited the Te Papa Museum, Wellington, New Zealand where I researched and documented pieces from their basketry collection. Staff at Te Papa are engaged in a major project focussed on digitising their collection using 3D scanning equipment. Seeing this process led me to consider a simple work of my own, based on using artefacts to inform digital design. In completing my prototype I am also reviewing Amit Zoran’s Hybrid Basketry project (MIT Media Lab)...
Gayle Matthias

Gayle Matthias

Anatomical Deconstruction series (cast glass and ceramic readymade) Gayle Matthias, gayle.matthias@falmouth.ac.uk Affiliation: Autonomatic, Falmouth University Keywords: Rapid Prototyping, glass casting, aesthetics. Conference activity: Pop Up Exhibition, Trelissick House Project summary: Should craft practitioners still predominantly make ‘beautiful physical objects through the skilled use of tools’1. Jorunn Veiteberg discusses in her book, Craft in Transition that in the world of fine art the notion of beauty has become a taboo subject, translated as an empty aesthetic, commercial, feminine and inconstant. For these reasons, it has become undervalued in this arena, and is being questioned by an increasing number of glass practitioners (myself included). The recent formation of the Seccessionist glass movement is making some inroads in this debate. Rather than ‘beautiful’, my desire is to make awkward objects with flaws and disparities that highlight a willful amateurism. The inherent qualities of broken glass being both fragile and dangerous, as opposed to shiny and translucent, form part of my visual vocabulary. My conventional artistic practice is deliberately low tech in construction, responding to broken ceramic found objects in the form of sanitary ware. Assembling cast and sheet glass to extend and redefine the ceramics to reference anatomical structures to create precarious and tactile compositions. I also collaborate with Tavs Jorgensen, Research Fellow at Falmouth University, in the investigation of Rapid Tooling (RT) 3D printed mould making for glass casting, alongside the digitization of ceramic edges using a 3D scanner. My intention is to connect ceramic objects in new configurations using cast glass as a conduit. By repositioning ceramic fragments on a grid base, the edges can be orientated using a digitizing...
Lynne MacLachlan-Eastwood

Lynne MacLachlan-Eastwood

The Creative Craft of Generative Design: New Tools, Same Rules Lynne MacLachlan-Eastwood Affiliation: Design Department, Open University Conference activity: Presentation Fri 11th July,  Pop Up Exhibition, Trelissick House Project summary: The co-evolution of new forms with specified tools characterises craft-led design. Algorithmic design systems are the latest ‘tools’ available to designers and makers. Why are these systems of relevance? Can such software be used by designer-makers to produce creative, that is, ‘new, surprising and valuable’ [1] artefacts? How do these creative opportunities arise through the use of these systems? This project seeks to answer these questions by drawing together literature from the fields of creativity, craft and generative design. Alongside this, examples have been drawn from the author’s own designer maker practice, which employs both physical and digital tools, and interviews with other designer-makers. References: Boden, M.A. (2004) The Creative Mind: Myths and Mechanisms 2nd ed., London: Routledge Dormer, P. (1994) The Art of the Maker: Skill and Its Meaning in Art, Craft and Design, London: Thames & Hudson Ltd Stiny, G. (2006) Shape: Talking About Seeing and Doing, Cambridge MA: MIT Press A question that arises from your project: Can makers benefit creatively from an explicit, rule based, rationalisation of their tools and processes? Full paper Maclachlan. L., (2014). The Creative Craft of Generative Design: New tools, same rules. In K. Bunnell & J. Marshall (Eds.), All Makers Now: Craft Values in 21st Century Production, International Conference Proceedings, Autonomatic Research Group, Falmouth University, 10/11 July 2014 (pp. 91 – 96). Falmouth University, ISBN 978-0-9544187-9-3...
Philip Luscombe, James Thomas

Philip Luscombe, James Thomas

Connoisseurship in Digital Engraving: The Petra Sancta Script Philip Luscombe, James Thomas Affiliation: Northumbria University Keywords: Engraving; Software development; Craftsmanship Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Demonstration Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition, Trelissick House Project summary: In the context of increasing access to digitally controlled engraving machines (both laser and rotary cutting machines), we consider how the body of knowledge developed throughout the long history of engraving can be supported in vector graphics software. The Petra Sancta system for translating the colours of heraldry into specific hatching patterns was developed in the 1630s and is still observed in heraldic engraving today. It offers a collection of 9 patterns, developed to provide an attractive and legible contrast with one another (Brittain et al., 1958, p.32). We present a piece of software developed by the authors, the Petra Sancta Adobe Illustrator plug-in, which can be used to generate these hatching patterns and output vector format files that are widely compatible with digitally controlled engraving hardware. The Petra Sancta plug-in is an effort to support the shared principles and rules of a traditional craft in digital software. Drawing on the work of anthropologist François Sigaut, who observes that ‘the entire history of technics might be interpreted as a constantly renewed attempt to build skills into machines by means of algorithms, an attempt constantly failed because other skills always tend to develop around the new machines’ (Sigaut, 1994, p.446), we see no need to lament the loss of hand skill associated with new digital engraving techniques. Trades such as engraving have always used novel tools and techniques to improve the precision and...
Jonathan Keep

Jonathan Keep

Make Your Own Digital Tool – Hard & Soft Jonathan Keep, Independent Artist Keywords: Ceramic, 3D Printing, Code Conference activity: Demonstration Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project summary: There is a long tradition of people who ‘make’, also making their own tools. While making has moved into the digital age, with all the advantages and new ways of working on offer, ultimately we must not forget that that it is just the continuum of a long established tradition: materials, process and the human desire to express ourselves through what we make remains. Being fascinated by how computer code can be used to mimic natural codes, patterns and processes I have developed a working process whereby the shapes of my pots are written and generated in computer code. This digital information is then printed directly in clay with a studio based DIY 3D printer. Credit goes to Belgium design duo UNFOLD who first refined the ceramic extrusion 3D printing technique. I have picked up on that development and because of the lack of a readily available 3D printer to convert to printing with clay I have designed and documented a self-build ceramic 3D printer of my own. This is the hard tool, that by sharing on the Internet, it is hoped the open source community will continue to develop further. It is important to emphasise that the tool building was not driven by an interest in the technology but by what the technology could offer creatively – the tools are a means to an end and not the end in themselves. The soft tools are best thought of...
Richard Hooper

Richard Hooper

Seeing Through Contemporary Craft: The Application of CNC Milling to Cast Acrylic form. Richard Hooper, Associate Professor Affiliation: Liverpool Hope University Conference activity: Pop Exhibition Trelissick House Keywords: CAD/CAM, CNC, Cast Acrylic Project Summary: The advent of computer aided manufacture methodologies has provided makers with additional tools sets with which to fashion objects. From early pioneer work by digital sculptors such as Duca (1965), Csuri (1968) and Fujihata (1968) to the quotidian use of such technologies in flexible specialist contexts (Piore and Sable, 1984) such as automotive, aerospace, general engineering and architecture . Whilst CAD/CAM was initially highly specialised, advances in solid modelling and more recently web based software along with price reductions in hardware and new Additive Layer Manufacture (ALM) technologies (since 1985) have led to an exponential increase in the use of such technologies amongst creative practitioners. Recent exhibitions featuring such work have proliferated. Along with the formal possibilities such technologies afford at levels of precision hitherto hard to achieve in an economically viable timeframe, less common materials such as cast acrylic have become materials now readily accessible to the digital craftsperson. This submission proposes to report on the work of the author who has exploited this capability using CNC milling methodologies. References: Piore M & Sabel C, (1984) The Second Industrial Divide: Possibilities for Prosperity, Basic Books. One question that arises from your project: In the field of Drama and Performance a central concern is the notion of ‘liveness’; to what extent is this analogous to the role of the hand in...
Konstantia Koulidou, Enrique Encinas

Konstantia Koulidou, Enrique Encinas

Knittstruments: Melodies of Weaving Konstantia Koulidou & Enrique Encinas Affiliation: SPIRE, Mads Clausen Institute. University of Southern Denmark. Keywords: Crafting, Knitting, Sound Interface Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Project Summary: Knittstruments: Melodies of Weaving is a project that explores and extends the expressive capabilities of the activity of knitting. It analyses the role of the craftsman (knitter) and how this is influenced when the expressive domain of the activity traditionally performed (knitting) is altered to obtain a different aesthetic output (music). In order to gain a better understanding of the relationship between craftsman, tool and skill, three different instruments (knittstruments) were assembled and tested in four different environments. The analysis from the data collected suggests substantial alterations in the knitters performance due to audio feedback at both an individual and group level. References: Ingold, T., 2000. The perception of environment, essays on Livelihood, Dwelling and skill, Routledge Kirsh, D. & Maglio, P., 1994. On distinguishing epistemic from pragmatic action in Cognitive Science, Vol 18, pp 513–54 One question that arises from your project: To which degree can a skilled practice, and the tacit knowledge that characterizes it, be faithfully translated into a different expressive domain? Full paper Koulidou. K, & Encinas, E. (2014). Knittstruments: Melodies of Weaving. In K. Bunnell & J. Marshall (Eds.), All Makers Now: Craft Values in 21st Century Production, International Conference Proceedings, Autonomatic Research Group, Falmouth University, 10/11 July 2014 (pp. 73 – 78). Falmouth University, ISBN 978-0-9544187-9-3 AMN2014_Koulidou_et_al...
Stephen Bottomley, Jennifer Gray, Geoffrey Mann

Stephen Bottomley, Jennifer Gray, Geoffrey Mann

Beneath the Surface / eca: Digital-craft borderlands in education Stephen Bottomley, Jennifer Gray, Geoffrey Mann Affiliation: Edinburgh College of Art / University of Edinburgh Key Words: Integration, (Im)-materiality, Practice-led teaching Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July,  Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project Summary: This presentation explores the current craft practices and ethos of academic craft makers within the Design school at Edinburgh College of Art / The University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh College of Art (eca) has had a strong virtuous tradition of studio-based practice dating back to the 18th Century and now with an increasing community of digitally versed makers, practices go beneath a material surface to investigate shared themes of production, narrative, and memory raising the following questions: How are digital methodologies being introduced to traditional studio based craft programs like Glass, Jewellery and Silversmithing by subject practitioners (Mann, Bottomley and Gray) and applied by their new emerging makers? Have values of craftsmanship altered when operating in the territory between craft culture and digital making? To explore these questions the philosophical approaches of Bottomley, Gray and Mann to research and practice, will be examined in relation to the academic curricula they shape through projects and post-graduate research at eca (e.g Bo-Wen Chan 2011). Examples will include: ‘LTD Edition’ an undergraduate project, now in its sixth consecutive year (2009-14), for the digital design and manufacture of small batch production runs of jewellery utilising industry level rapid prototyping manufacture and casting and most recently sintering technologies. ‘Otherwise Unobtainable’ an undergraduate project that introduces digital fabrication as an integrated tool within studio glass. The project was designed as a response to the...