Katharina Vones

Katharina Vones

Technological Microcosms – Considering Materiality, Aesthetic Coherence and Collaborative Practice in the Creation of Wearable Futures Katharina Vones  Affiliation: Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, University of Dundee Conference Activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Workshop Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition, Trelissick House Keywords: Smart Materials, Wearable Futures, Collaborative Practice Project summary: With the increased availability of digital tools to the contemporary craft practitioner providing an almost limitless potential for creation, the questions posed regarding the development of a coherent aesthetic language that combines both the handmade and the digitally crafted, have become progressively more pressing in the applied arts. To use these elements in such a way that they can be merged into an aesthetically articulate object combined with traditional craftsmanship is a challenge my research investigates. Visual and functional considerations are addressed together, thus developing material and technological solutions that constitute a cohesive part of the jewellery object. Exploring a holistic approach whereby material experimentation and digital production processes are used to facilitate the development of aesthetically integrated and humanised wearable technologies that supersede ideas of mere gadgetry is a focus of my practice. Through examining the notion that human biology is a part of material culture, my presentation investigates how recent developments in material science and wearable technologies can be viewed as contiguous rather than oppositional to the organic processes of the human body, bridging the gap between the craft practitioner and scientific discovery. The increasing availability of stimulus-reactive smart materials, in addition to the progressive miniaturisation of electromechanical components, has enabled the development of jewellery objects that are responsive to their environment, yet depend...
Dries Verbruggen

Dries Verbruggen

The digital craftsman and his tools Dries Verbruggen Affiliation: Unfold design studio, LUCA School of Arts, Design Academy Eindhoven Keywords: 3D Printing, Ceramics, Design, Tools, Open Source, Craft, Industry. Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Workshop Fri 11th July and Exhibit Project summary: From knife to hammer to 3d printer, the influence of tools on a design is not to be underestimated. In his essay “Tools,” originally published in 2000 in a book covering the work of LettError, Jan Middendorp argues for the importance of creating your own tools. He refers to the fact that a craftsman, the predecessor of the designer, was never completely satisfied with the tools that were sold in shops. Yet for a long time the instruments of production have been closed systems, discouraging appropriation. This is now changing. Following the personal computer and a range of digital advances, the advent of the personal digital fabricator has lowered the barrier into production and provoked a revival of the idea of “making your own things.” Unfold started to ‘customize’ their 3D printer into a clay printer. The open source hardware allows them – similar to traditional craftsmen – to create their own tools. By doing so they break away from a predetermined way of designing, dictated by the existing digital tools. As such, they can thoroughly intervene in the production process, and therefore also in the eventual design. Unfold’s 3d printer for ceramics not only harnesses the potential of new technology and materials but also projects the past history of specific techniques into the future. The printer has a great resonance with the way traditional potters...
Matthew Tyas

Matthew Tyas

Designing 21st Century Standard Ware: The Cultural Heritage of Leach and the Creative and Economic Benefits of Digital Technologies Matthew Tyas Affiliation: Falmouth University: Autonomatic and Leach Pottery, St Ives Keywords: Digital craft/making, Creative Practice, Studio Pottery Conference Activity: Presentation Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition, Trelissick House Project Summary: The Leach Pottery, established in 1920, is a stronghold of the UK Studio Pottery movement and synonymous with Bernard Leach’s unique and progressive assimilation of Eastern and Western pottery aesthetics and methods. This assimilation was expressed through his practice and writings, and further propagated through Leach Standard Ware: the Pottery’s domestic tableware that was produced over the period of about 40 years until 1979. In 2008, the Leach Pottery reopened as a museum and educational resource, and resumed the production of domestic pots in a new studio. This presentation explores opportunities presented by digital tools in the context of the Leach Pottery. Leach’s writing reveals a positive attitude to the relationship between technology and making: ‘The next step is to get rid of the idea of the machine as an enemy. The machine is an extension of the tool; the tool of the hand; the hand of the brain; and it is only the unfaithful use of machinery which we can attack’ (Leach 1928). The idea of using digital tools in a Leach Pottery context has been a difficult prospect for some potters, whose perception of ‘digital’ was associated with a lack of humanity, authenticity, and creativity. The project has challenged these perceptions and raises questions on a philosophical level with regard to setting new standards for contemporary studio...
Flemming Tvede Hansen, Martin Tamke

Flemming Tvede Hansen, Martin Tamke

Interfacing design and making of Ceramics,  Expansion of ceramics practice through technology Flemming Tvede Hansen, Ceramicist and Research Assistant Professor, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts – The School of Design. Martin Tamke, Architect and Associate Professor at CITA, Henrik Leander Evers, Research Assistant at CITA; The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts – The School of Architecture. Conference activity: Presentation Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Keywords: Ceramics, 3D digital interactive system, 3d printing. Project summary: This research investigates the relationship between crafting materiality and digital representation, and how experiential knowledge of crafts rooted in ceramics can be transformed and utilised in the use of digital technologies. Digital technology as 3D printing with ceramic allows a bridge from the digital design environment to fabrication. At the same time novel digital means can create new interfaces between the human, space and the material. Here advances in 3d motion capture technology and sensors allow capturing spatial hand gestures and body movement in real-time. Where technology often seems to take us away from material this approach enables the designer’s body to be once again involved in the making. This approach builds on McCullough’s (1998) idea about a close connection between digital work and a craft practice where tacit knowledge is involved (Dormer 1994). In this project a design experiment is used as a method of inquiry within reflective practice involving reflection on and through action (Schön 1993). The experiment in question investigates the idea of an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics and is working on two levels. One which has to...
Kate Goldsworthy & Helen Paine

Kate Goldsworthy & Helen Paine

Laser Welding of Textiles: A Creative Approach to Technology Through a Reflective Craft Practice Kate Goldsworthy & Helen Paine Affiliation: University of the Arts London (UAL) & Royal College of Art (RCA) Keywords: technology, craft, textile finishing, laser welding, tacit knowledge, creative problem solving Conference activity: Presentation Project summary: In an increasingly digital age of manufacture the role of the craft practitioner and particularly hand making processes has had to be reconsidered. There are those that would argue the depletion of goods made by hand simply negates the need for making skills in the development of new products; however, there is an emerging argument that places more value in the potential benefit of craft practice, and particularly making, to bridge between scientific knowledge and the needs of industry. This paper calls upon the research of Dr. Kate Goldsworthy and Helen Paine, who have utilised laser-welding equipment, to explore the benefits of a ‘craft approach’ in assisting the development of an emerging technology, for decorative and functional textile finishing applications. Goldsworthy first worked with the technology in 2008 during her doctoral research, and has used it to develop unique surface finishes for textiles that preserve material purity and can be recycled within a closed-loop system. The inventors of the technology, TWI, fund Paine’s current doctoral research, and wrote the original brief for the project that is essentially technology driven; from which Paine has chosen to investigate new aesthetic and functional opportunities for stretch textiles offered by the equipment. Despite the disparate contexts for the research of Goldsworthy and Paine, their shared background in textile design has led them both to follow a...
Justin Novak

Justin Novak

DARWIN / The Designer Toy Platform as a Means of Academic Inquiry Justin Novak Affiliation: Centre for Applied Art and Material Production (CAAMP) Emily Carr University of Art & Design, Vancouver, Canada Keywords: Designer Toys, Ceramics, Illustration. Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Pop Up ExhibitionTrelissick House. Collaborating Artists: Atafeh Baradaran, Amelia Butcher, Nomi Chi, Hyun Chung, M.J. Hur, Ainsley Jasper, Justin Novak, Philip Robbins, Michael Salter, Patrick Wong Project summary: Collaboratively designed by students and the faculty of Illustration program at Emily Carr University, the Darwin project employs industrial ceramic processes but adopts the aesthetics and collaborative dynamics of the explosive “Urban Vinyl” subculture. As a generic figurative form that lacks detail and invites transformation through surface design, Darwin appropriates the strategy of the designer toy “platform”, popularised by Toy2R’s Qee and KidRobot’s Dunny. The project involves glazed ceramic “blanks” that are produced as identical multiples that are then offered to collaborators, each of whom provide a unique surface pattern to create a customised version of the product. Like his namesake, Darwin is all about adaptation, and offers an ideal opportunity for collaborative experimentation. Regardless of the creator’s experience with ceramic media, any digitised image can be applied and kiln-fired onto the form with specialised ceramic decals. Unlike the vinyl toys that inspired them, the Darwin figures are conceived and presented primarily as a form of academic inquiry – an invitation to investigate our adaptive and/or conditional nature. The Darwin project aims to investigate how the collective and potentially disparate concerns of a community might be manifested symbolically or allegorically. This research project explores the ability of a collection...
Joanne McCallum

Joanne McCallum

(re)crafting basketry: exploring the relationship between traditional techniques and digital design Joanne McCallum, Independent Maker Keywords: Basketry, craft, digital design Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project Summary: I see patterns when I understand things. I see the world as visual patterns of connectivity. I think pattern recognition is a fundamental part of the creative mind… I see everything as patterns. – Richard Saul Wurman (Architect and Information Architect) I am currently applying to undertake a practice-led PhD exploring the role of Japanese bamboo basketry as an informative miniature for digital design, manifesting nature and the value of hand-hewn craft. As a precursor to this work I am considering the pattern relationships between traditional basketry and digital design. At present, I am examining and documenting a basket from the British Museum collection in order to create a hybrid-craft prototype, via 3d modelling software and digital printing technology. I will present this project at All Makers Now under the theme Enhancing the Object, in order to: highlight interdisciplinary collaborative practices that have enabled successful outcomes; and develop a digitally enhanced object in the context of a museum. Late last year I visited the Te Papa Museum, Wellington, New Zealand where I researched and documented pieces from their basketry collection. Staff at Te Papa are engaged in a major project focussed on digitising their collection using 3D scanning equipment. Seeing this process led me to consider a simple work of my own, based on using artefacts to inform digital design. In completing my prototype I am also reviewing Amit Zoran’s Hybrid Basketry project (MIT Media Lab)...
Lynne MacLachlan-Eastwood

Lynne MacLachlan-Eastwood

The Creative Craft of Generative Design: New Tools, Same Rules Lynne MacLachlan-Eastwood Affiliation: Design Department, Open University Conference activity: Presentation Fri 11th July,  Pop Up Exhibition, Trelissick House Project summary: The co-evolution of new forms with specified tools characterises craft-led design. Algorithmic design systems are the latest ‘tools’ available to designers and makers. Why are these systems of relevance? Can such software be used by designer-makers to produce creative, that is, ‘new, surprising and valuable’ [1] artefacts? How do these creative opportunities arise through the use of these systems? This project seeks to answer these questions by drawing together literature from the fields of creativity, craft and generative design. Alongside this, examples have been drawn from the author’s own designer maker practice, which employs both physical and digital tools, and interviews with other designer-makers. References: Boden, M.A. (2004) The Creative Mind: Myths and Mechanisms 2nd ed., London: Routledge Dormer, P. (1994) The Art of the Maker: Skill and Its Meaning in Art, Craft and Design, London: Thames & Hudson Ltd Stiny, G. (2006) Shape: Talking About Seeing and Doing, Cambridge MA: MIT Press A question that arises from your project: Can makers benefit creatively from an explicit, rule based, rationalisation of their tools and processes? Full paper Maclachlan. L., (2014). The Creative Craft of Generative Design: New tools, same rules. In K. Bunnell & J. Marshall (Eds.), All Makers Now: Craft Values in 21st Century Production, International Conference Proceedings, Autonomatic Research Group, Falmouth University, 10/11 July 2014 (pp. 91 – 96). Falmouth University, ISBN 978-0-9544187-9-3...
Philip Luscombe, James Thomas

Philip Luscombe, James Thomas

Connoisseurship in Digital Engraving: The Petra Sancta Script Philip Luscombe, James Thomas Affiliation: Northumbria University Keywords: Engraving; Software development; Craftsmanship Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Demonstration Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition, Trelissick House Project summary: In the context of increasing access to digitally controlled engraving machines (both laser and rotary cutting machines), we consider how the body of knowledge developed throughout the long history of engraving can be supported in vector graphics software. The Petra Sancta system for translating the colours of heraldry into specific hatching patterns was developed in the 1630s and is still observed in heraldic engraving today. It offers a collection of 9 patterns, developed to provide an attractive and legible contrast with one another (Brittain et al., 1958, p.32). We present a piece of software developed by the authors, the Petra Sancta Adobe Illustrator plug-in, which can be used to generate these hatching patterns and output vector format files that are widely compatible with digitally controlled engraving hardware. The Petra Sancta plug-in is an effort to support the shared principles and rules of a traditional craft in digital software. Drawing on the work of anthropologist François Sigaut, who observes that ‘the entire history of technics might be interpreted as a constantly renewed attempt to build skills into machines by means of algorithms, an attempt constantly failed because other skills always tend to develop around the new machines’ (Sigaut, 1994, p.446), we see no need to lament the loss of hand skill associated with new digital engraving techniques. Trades such as engraving have always used novel tools and techniques to improve the precision and...
Konstantia Koulidou, Enrique Encinas

Konstantia Koulidou, Enrique Encinas

Knittstruments: Melodies of Weaving Konstantia Koulidou & Enrique Encinas Affiliation: SPIRE, Mads Clausen Institute. University of Southern Denmark. Keywords: Crafting, Knitting, Sound Interface Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Project Summary: Knittstruments: Melodies of Weaving is a project that explores and extends the expressive capabilities of the activity of knitting. It analyses the role of the craftsman (knitter) and how this is influenced when the expressive domain of the activity traditionally performed (knitting) is altered to obtain a different aesthetic output (music). In order to gain a better understanding of the relationship between craftsman, tool and skill, three different instruments (knittstruments) were assembled and tested in four different environments. The analysis from the data collected suggests substantial alterations in the knitters performance due to audio feedback at both an individual and group level. References: Ingold, T., 2000. The perception of environment, essays on Livelihood, Dwelling and skill, Routledge Kirsh, D. & Maglio, P., 1994. On distinguishing epistemic from pragmatic action in Cognitive Science, Vol 18, pp 513–54 One question that arises from your project: To which degree can a skilled practice, and the tacit knowledge that characterizes it, be faithfully translated into a different expressive domain? Full paper Koulidou. K, & Encinas, E. (2014). Knittstruments: Melodies of Weaving. In K. Bunnell & J. Marshall (Eds.), All Makers Now: Craft Values in 21st Century Production, International Conference Proceedings, Autonomatic Research Group, Falmouth University, 10/11 July 2014 (pp. 73 – 78). Falmouth University, ISBN 978-0-9544187-9-3 AMN2014_Koulidou_et_al...
Stephen Bottomley, Jennifer Gray, Geoffrey Mann

Stephen Bottomley, Jennifer Gray, Geoffrey Mann

Beneath the Surface / eca: Digital-craft borderlands in education Stephen Bottomley, Jennifer Gray, Geoffrey Mann Affiliation: Edinburgh College of Art / University of Edinburgh Key Words: Integration, (Im)-materiality, Practice-led teaching Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July,  Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project Summary: This presentation explores the current craft practices and ethos of academic craft makers within the Design school at Edinburgh College of Art / The University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh College of Art (eca) has had a strong virtuous tradition of studio-based practice dating back to the 18th Century and now with an increasing community of digitally versed makers, practices go beneath a material surface to investigate shared themes of production, narrative, and memory raising the following questions: How are digital methodologies being introduced to traditional studio based craft programs like Glass, Jewellery and Silversmithing by subject practitioners (Mann, Bottomley and Gray) and applied by their new emerging makers? Have values of craftsmanship altered when operating in the territory between craft culture and digital making? To explore these questions the philosophical approaches of Bottomley, Gray and Mann to research and practice, will be examined in relation to the academic curricula they shape through projects and post-graduate research at eca (e.g Bo-Wen Chan 2011). Examples will include: ‘LTD Edition’ an undergraduate project, now in its sixth consecutive year (2009-14), for the digital design and manufacture of small batch production runs of jewellery utilising industry level rapid prototyping manufacture and casting and most recently sintering technologies. ‘Otherwise Unobtainable’ an undergraduate project that introduces digital fabrication as an integrated tool within studio glass. The project was designed as a response to the...
Bettina Nissen

Bettina Nissen

Growing Artefacts out of Making Bettina Nissen Affiliation: PhD Candidate, Culture Lab, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne Keywords: embodied craft, making materialisation, reflective fabrication Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Project summary: In this paper I am presenting a speculative exploration into materialisations of digitally captured craft gestures as evocative artefacts. I am discussing initial findings and early experiments of a design-led case study capturing and translating transient movements of crochet practitioners into material traces of the making process. The skilled process of craft is an active and embodied engagement with materials. As Ingold (2013) stresses, a person’s involvement in the organic making process of an object is essential to creating more meaningful connections. He goes further to state that “I want to think of making […] as a process of growth”(Ingold 2013: p.21), hence focusing on the natural relationship between making and meaning. With this in mind, my research is exploring the relationship between the experience of making, the meaning of material artefacts and digital fabrication as tool for reflection. Maker culture and craft practice is a growing area of interest in HCI research. As shown by Rosner et al. (2009), digital technology can be used to augment and annotate artefacts in order to elicit reflection on craft practice and encourage communication. Further technological advances in movement capture allow recording of additional facets of the embodied making process, which are often documented via video and pictorial representations only. In this case study, gestural aspects of the making process were recorded digitally and translated into physical traces as “provocations to thought” (Turkle 2007: p.5) in order to facilitate communication and reflection....
Mhairi Maxwell, Jennifer Gray

Mhairi Maxwell, Jennifer Gray

Design-Archaeology: Bringing a Pictish inspired drinking horn fitting to life Mhairi Maxwell and Jennifer Gray Affiliation: Glasgow School of Art and Edinburgh College of Art Conference Activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Keywords: Authenticity, Recreation, Design-Archaeology Project Summary: The Glenmorangie Early Medieval Research Project recreated objects from the period c.300-900AD in collaboration with artists, designers and makers. Contemporary skills and traditional craft were used, informed directly from the archaeological evidence. This process of recreation has allowed us to experience these ancient objects as new, giving us insights into how they were made, experienced and used. This paper will present the collaborative processes involved in the latest recreation of a silver terminal fitting for a large drinking horn with Researchers and Curators Mhairi Maxwell and Martin Goldberg, and Designer and Maker Jennifer Gray. Digital design and modelling processes were blended with traditional hand making techniques to recreate the silver zoomorphic fitting. The final piece was displayed as a ‘work in progress’ (illustrating its conception from 3D modelling and printing through to the final silver cast object) in the National Museum of Scotland’s Creative Spirit exhibition. Our design-archaeology approach towards material culture allows for a new way to re-evaluate Early Medieval insular art. Jennifer Gray’s work connects the innovative and traditional methods of recreation used by the Glenmorangie Research Project; there has always been a tension between authentic craft techniques available to the Early Medieval people and new technologies available to us today. In this paper we will negotiate questions of authenticity, transparency and creativity that were raised by our particular collaborative approach to recreation. The process of designing and making has...
Rachel Clarke, Paul Dunphy

Rachel Clarke, Paul Dunphy

Photo-parshiya: Crafting and sharing cultural heritage in an international women’s centre Rachel Clarke & Paul Dunphy Affiliation: Digital Interaction at Culture Lab, Newcastle University Keywords: Presentation, Exhibit, photo-sharing Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project Summary: Parshiya is an ancient word that means to participate in a group, family, community, or collective. The photo-parshiya is an enhanced object, a digital photo-album designed to support the sharing of cultural heritage, designed with staff and learners at the Angelou Centre, an international women’s centre in the North East of England. The photo-parshiya can be held like a book and is portable or can be docked as a double touch screen tablet display on a bespoke crafted wooden base. The artefact has been developed through interdisciplinary collaborative practice involving an artist ethnographer, interaction designer, programmer, engineer and furniture designers in response to long-term digital creative media and DIY craft workshops with learners and staff. Women who come to the Centre have made individually designed necklaces enabling reflection and discussion on aspects of identity and cultural heritage. The necklaces are networked with the tablet displays to create personalized photo-collections and have been used to accompany workshops exploring cultural heritage, transnational migration and trade. In using the photo-parshiya in workshops, many women have described how this has supported greater feelings of pride, confidence and curiosity in working with digital technology to curate and share photographs of fulfilling life experiences and achievements. This has further enabled the building of new relationships with friends while supporting existing intergenerational family negotiations around technology use in the home. The process of making and using the artefact...
Barney Townsend

Barney Townsend

Barney Townsend Affiliation: London South Bank University, Royal College of Art Keywords: 3D Printing, Open Source, Project-based Learning  Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project Summary: Following the expiration of the patents on the FDM 3D printing process some years ago, a significant market for open 3D printers emerged, fuelling popular media claims that one might be found in every home before long. Anderson (2012) hails a new era of democratized innovation that these (and other) digital technologies will enable. The domestic printers, however, are not necessarily the utopian home fabrication tool that the hype might lead us to believe. They require considerable technical skills to assemble and operate, and on-going maintenance and adjustment to both hardware and software in order to keep them operating effectively. The organic and changing nature of the open 3d printer movement means that the hardware often outgrows the literature and learning resources that are available, making the assembly and operating process a complex and sometimes frustrating task for the new user. This paper will document the challenges and opportunities for innovation presented by the process of building an open source 3D printer from the perspective of 2nd year BSc students of Engineering Product Design at the author’s institution. The project was designed to explore the learning experience that a self-directed technical assembly and design project can offer to students, and by extension, to other user groups and makers as well.  In addition to the insights that might be gained into the Open Source and Maker Movement paradigms, the detailed understanding of 3D printing technology, and the associated technical skills,...
Angharad Thomas

Angharad Thomas

The Glove Project Dr Angharad Thomas Affiliation: The Knitting and Crochet Guild, UK Keywords: Making, designing, skill Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Workshop Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project summary: The Glove Project includes design, making, blogging and historical research, resulting in the production of about 20 pairs of hand knitted gloves, alongside sketchbooks, interviews and conference papers. The gloves are made by hand, but the project relies on electronic and digital technologies, some examples being: Sourcing patterns, materials and historic examples on line Sourcing information and advice has been facilitated through Ravelry, the wiki for knitters and crocheters The knittingloves blog, documents progress and connects to other knitters. The design philosophy underpinning this project draws its inspiration from makers and design thinkers, primarily Eva Zeisel, with her roots in production ceramics and Anni Albers whose Modernist stance informed her woven textiles. David Pye’s conceptualisations of workmanship, as those of certainty and risk are also relevant. Knitting has been at the forefront of the making movement, said to be a response to the 9/11 attacks in New York in 2001, as the ultimate comfort activity. This has been largely led by self taught knitters who use web tools, such as Ravelry and YouTube to learn, teach and refine new techniques and increase skill levels. The use of these tools has enabled them to establish themselves as significant figures in the knitting landscape with little or no formal design education. Much information on the making process is shared through blogs, Ravelry and Twitter. In response to the growth of knitting and other crafts, small producers of all...
Rebecca Taylor

Rebecca Taylor

Becoming a Culture of Digi-Makers: Curiosity, Creative Confidence and Imagination at Technology Faires Rebecca Taylor Affiliation: HighWire, Lancaster University, Shrimping.It Keywords: Digi-Makers, Creative Confidence, Values-Led Participatory Design Conference Activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Project Summary: If technology faires are inspiring and nurturing a culture of digi-makers (Fuad-Luke, A. 2009) this exploratory study asks how is our creative confidence being challenged as we face and engage in becoming a culture of Digi-Makers? Reflecting on the context of the Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths Network (STEMNet) and the first of its kind, iTECH Design Your Future event hosted by the Museum of Science and Industry (MoSI) in Manchester, March 2014, this fast paced and highly interactive event format offers participants an engaging and informal learning environment. Drawing on a collaborative experiment titled ‘The Invention of Things’, two activities were facilitated by The Curiosity Bureau and Shrimping.It. The inventions made by the participants during their involvement with the Imagination Studio have prompted further areas of inquiry into technology faires such as; how is creative confidence (T. Kelley & D. Kelly 2013) encouraged? How can values-led participatory design (Iversena, O. 2012) be applied to the invention of electronic devices? Why does there appear to be a struggle by students curious of technology to imagine and to think beyond the cues of the facilitator References: Fuad-Luke, A. 2009. ‘Re-crafting capitalism, regenerating societies: How do designer-makers amplify, build and regenerate social capital?’ Paper presented at Making Futures, Plymouth College of Art, 17-18 September 2009. Iversena, O., Halskova, K. and Leong, T. 2012. ‘Values-led participatory design’, CoDesign. Vol. 8, Nos. 2–3, June–September 2012, 87–103. Taylor & Francis....
Michael Shorter, Jon Rogers, Dr John McGhee, Erika Shorter

Michael Shorter, Jon Rogers, Dr John McGhee, Erika Shorter

A Craft Technologist’s Approach Towards Printed Electronics Michael Shorter, Professor Jon Rogers, Dr John McGhee, Erika Shorter. Affiliation: Eclectric Research Studio, University of Dundee, 3D Visualisation Aesthetics Lab, University of New South Wales Keywords: Craft, Technology, Reflection. Conference activity: Presentation/exhibit Project Summary: This paper opens a conversation around what printed electronics are and how a craft technologist would use craft process values such as reflection and an understanding of materiality while navigating this emerging technology. The outcome of exploring printed electronics through a craft technologist’s lens is paper circuitry: an affordable and accessible take on printed electronics that is informed by craft process. Justin Marshall explores the role of technology as a craft tool in Craft and Technology from a Pragmatic Perspective [2]. While technology typically influences craft, this paper will invert the ratio. How can craft processes help to develop printed electronics technology, and by extension other emerging technologies?  References: Coelho, M., Hall, L., Berzowska, J., Maes, P. (2009), Pulp-based computing: a framework for building computers out of paper, in: Proceedings of the 27th International Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, Boston, MA, USA, pp. 3527–3528. Marshall, J. (2002), Craft and Technology from a Pragmatic Perspective. Presented at Craft in the 21st Century, Edinburgh. (www.autonomatic.org.uk/archive/team/jm/JMcraft-techpaper.pdf) Schön, D.A. (2003), The reflective practitioner : how professionals think in action. Ashgate, Aldershot. A question that arises from your project: How can a Craft Technologist democratise emerging technology? Full paper: Shorter, M., Rogers, J., McGhee, J., & Shorter, E. (2014), A Craft Technologist’s Approach Towards Printed Electronics. In K. Bunnell & J. Marshall (Eds.), All Makers Now: Craft Values...
Philip Robbins, Keith Doyle, Emily Carr, Helene Day-Fraser

Philip Robbins, Keith Doyle, Emily Carr, Helene Day-Fraser

Material Matters: Hybridizing emergent digital methodologies across legacy creation ecosystems Philip Robbins, Keith Doyle and Helene Day-Fraser   Affiliation: Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Vancouver, Canada Keywords: 3D printing, legacy process, effective integration Conference Activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Project Summary: Material Matters – a research cluster at Emily Carr University of Art+Design – is exploring new digital production technologies as an analogue to traditional methods and material production. The Prototyping+Media+Programming (PMP) Studio at Emily Carr, which supports Material Matters, offers a wide spectrum of 3D production technologies that showcase a variety of gateways to technology uptake. The Material Matters research cluster is actively engaged in faculty–led creative research, applied partnerships, and outreach, each approaching unique and appropriate solutions through the exploration of additive manufacturing means and methods. As 3D production technologies become less expensive, more powerful and more pervasive they emerge into wider and wider ranges of opportunity. As new digital pathways to creative production develop they intersect with established practice – Material Matters is centered at these points of contact. 3D printing is a digital production technology experiencing explosive growth; a proliferation of applications and technologies is multiplying across a very broad spectrum of creative activity. As the technology matures and disseminates, avenues for innovation multiply as the 3D printing ecosystem grows and diversifies. Material Matters is examining a diversity of conceptually interlinked inquiries framed by this new production platform. We are developing alternate workflows to object making that conflates the digital opportunity with the inherent strengths of legacy processes. Conceived as symbiotic methods – rather than discreet, self-contained systems – Material Matters is examining how...
Amanda Ravetz

Amanda Ravetz

Entry: Digital objects and the (dis)placement of knowledge Amanda Ravetz  Affiliation: Manchester School of Art, MIRIAD Keywords: craft, film, displaced knowledge Conference Activity: Presentation Fri 11th July Project Summary: New digital technologies and networks offer an unrivalled opportunity to communicate with others. But these same technologies also allow for “the transfer of this knowledge out of the domain in which it is generated.” (Leach 2012). What are the ethical and social implications for craft of this transfer of knowledge, particularly given craft’s long history of bodily intelligence, which traditionally makes it resistant to abstraction and transfer? This question arises from a project that in transferring knowledge from a ‘real’ domain to a ‘virtual’ one via a digital film and digital platforms, produced two very different responses from the communities involved – those who were filmed and the those involved in filming. Entry was made during a three and a half week research residency in Dhal ni Pol, one of 600 pols located in the old city of Ahmedabad. It depicts a playful community-focused response to a small doorway decorated with ceramic flowers placed in a public space. In Entry we witness the everyday aesthetics of this part of Ahmedebad’s old city: a mother gently oiling the hair of the child, a group of children spontaneously breaking into a garba, a trademark cycle decorated with garlands. Once uploaded to digital platforms and sent around the world, the film effectively abstracted knowledge – including everyday craft knowledge – from the relationships in which it was normally embedded. While this represents a good fit with the (Euro-American) idea of knowledge as something whose...
Chamithri Greru, Dr Britta Kalkreuter

Chamithri Greru, Dr Britta Kalkreuter

Match making: Broadening cultural exchange opportunities through digital access to crafts. Chamithri Greru and Britta Kalkreuter Affiliation: Heriot Watt University, Scotland Keywords: cross-cultures, digital- engagements, craft Conference activity: Presentation Fri 11th July Project Summary: There is a growing interest in cross-cultural exchanges between practitioners (Ravetz et al. 2013). However, even in this climate keen on cultural immersion, creating effective and meaningful engagements remains a challenging enterprise, and critics have posited that ‘craft is not straightforwardly democratic’ (ibid). Could technology’s ever rising accessibility thus be the answer for equalising the playing field for cultural exchange, opening opportunities for creative engagements irrespective of distance and mobility? The paper explores how we might transpose the characteristics of meaningful cultural exchange into a digital environment. By exploring digital potential within a cross cultural residency (ReSIde) funded by Creative Scotland in 2012/3, it questions what the digital equivalent of immersing oneself in other cultures might be, and what possibilities for collaborative creation there are at a distance. Thus it seeks to define what the 21st century digital making cultures might be calling for. As international residencies are resource and time intensive, thus largely benefiting the chosen few, this paper investigates how digital platforms can create sustainable knowledge communities, resulting in knowledge mobility that is frequent and economic. A specific focus of analogue making cultures, witnessed during the ReSIde residency by practitioners of both traditional and contemporary making was found to be the use of ‘appresentation’ (Moon 2004). We are debating to what extend this method of creating meaningful experiences is adaptable, congenial and appropriate for the digital environment, focusing particularly on social networking platforms...
Lucie Hernandez, Edwin Love

Lucie Hernandez, Edwin Love

Crafting Data Stories Lucie Hernandez & Edwin Love Affiliation: University of West London Keywords: Craft, Tangible, Data Conference activity: Workshop/Demonstration Fri 11th July Project summary: This demonstration will deconstruct a recent piece of research exploring the possibility of making connections between physical, crafted artefacts and graphical data visualisations that are structured around digital information. The work investigates the design of tangible objects as a representation of data, a rendering in physical form. In order to establish whether technological forms may also be crafted. It questions whether the ‘crafting’ implied in the work occurred during the creation of the physical artifact. The tangible nature of the representation relates our experience of mediated communication to a crafted object. The notion of craft practice has expanded to include growing experimentation across media to create hybrid constructions. Craft techniques are now integrating with electronic & digital knowledge, tools and processes to suggest new directions and possibilities. Graphic and tangible pieces may be the product of more than one individual, the result of several skilled people that use their distributed skills to connect otherwise disparate ideas and skills. The work being explored is informed by digital and handmade making practices, emerging hybrid forms and computationally mediated worlds. References: Goldsteijn, C. Van De Hoven, E. Frohlich, D, Sellen, A., 2013. Hybrid Crafting: Towards an Integrated Practice of Crafting with Physical and Digital Components. Personal & Ubiquitous Computing, Springer McCandless, D., 2012. Information is Beautiful. Collins McCullough, M., 1996. Abstracting Craft. MIT Press A question that arises from your project: Can data be crafted in tangible forms to reveal stories or patterns and suggest a multi-sensory dimension? Full...
Fiona Hackney, Mary Loveday Edwards and Hannah Maughan

Fiona Hackney, Mary Loveday Edwards and Hannah Maughan

Community Making & Making Communities: crafting non/digital interactions Fiona Hackney, Mary Loveday Edwards and Hannah Maughan  Affiliation: Falmouth University Keywords: co-design, community, stitch Conference activity: Presentation Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project Summary: Millions engage in creative handicrafts, activities that are undertaken voluntarily for pleasure and involve high levels of competence and creativity, representing an important area of community assets that is often devalued or dismissed (Hackney, 2013a). This paper draws on research from the AHRC-funded project Co-creating CARE (Community Asset-based Research and Enterprise) which explores how crafts knowledge might be applied through processes of co-design (engaging all stakeholders), co-creation (collaborative work) and co-discovery (by formal and informal researchers).The project works with community groups and partners in Cornwall, Birmingham and Dublin and uses participatory action research methods in digital fabrication, virtual communication, and face-to-face activities and workshops. CARE initially aimed to explore how craft might work as a bridging activity, bringing disparate groups together to enhance social capital, and a series of short films explored intergenerational skill sharing through creative making (Hackney 2013b). These demonstrated how film can communicate crafts in community settings; the activity also revealed the power relationships embedded in creative exchange, as tensions emerged around, for instance, digital making, suggesting important questions about the future of traditional skills and how these might be productively combined with new technologies (Maughan 2014). To find out more about collective sharing through making research took what we term a ‘material consequences’ approach, embracing playfulness and risk. Participating groups were asked to collaboratively devise ways to capture and reflect on the ‘small stories’ of collaborative interaction through making. The...
Katrien Dreessen, Ollivier Piqueray, Jessica Schoffelen, Danny Leen

Katrien Dreessen, Ollivier Piqueray, Jessica Schoffelen, Danny Leen

Great expectations and big challenges: a FabLab as a facilitator for personal fabrication of tools to self-manage diabetes Katrien Dreessen, Ollivier Piqueray, Jessica Schoffelen, Danny Leen Affiliation: Social Spaces, Media, Arts & Design Faculty, LUCA School of Arts/Catholic University Leuven and University Hasselt Conference activity: Presentation Fri 11th July Keywords: FabLab, participatory design, personal fabrication Project summary: This project discusses a FabLab as a research and production environment within the project Bespoke Design. Bespoke Design (www.designopmaat.be/) deals with the participatory design of self-management tools for and together with people with type 1 diabetes. The project explores the role of FabLab Genk (www.fablabgenk.be) for developing these tools and how sharing and documenting the process of these tools enables others, e.g. people with diabetes or designers, to redesign them (Schoffelen, Huybrechts, Dreessen, 2013). Although the context of a FabLab as an open and accessible workshop is very beneficial for the idea of personal fabrication, some important challenges remain. A major obstacle is having the necessity of skills and expertise for using the different machines in a FabLab since lack of these will lead to time and cost consuming trial and error, questioning the relevance of developing personalised tools. For instance, to use a 3D-printer one needs to know how to design for it and have specific knowledge of the characteristics of the material. However, we believe that including FabLab Genk in a participatory approach provides the designer and FabLab expert with a new role in these kinds of design projects, i.e. a mediator between the participant and the machinery. Furthermore, designing in this context expands this mediator-role from conceptual design (exploring problems and possibilities through co-design...
Roberta Bernabei

Roberta Bernabei

Digital Jewellery: The Democratisation of Authorship and Ownership Roberta Bernabei – Senior Lecturer in 3D Design, Silversmithing & Jewellery. Affiliation: School of the Arts, Loughborough University Keywords: jewellery, democratisation, CAD/CAM Conference activity: Presentation Fri 11th July Project summary:  This presentation analyses the consequences on the authorship and ownership of contemporary jewellery through computer aided design and manufacture (CAD/CAM). It identifies the ramifications for jewellery design and contemporary jewellery through an examination of the respective roles of the jewellery designer, contemporary jeweller and consumer. The latter focuses on the extent to which individual members of the public can become virtual craftspeople. It therefore aims to ascertain if and how the act of creating jewellery has been democratised through digital manufacture and delivery. A complementary investigation seeks to establish how far CAD/CAM has enabled contemporary jewellers to democratise the consumption of artistic jewellery through a reduction in production costs. Discussions chart CAD’s gradual shift from exclusive use by expert technicians to generic deployment by amateurs manipulating user-friendly and intuitive software. They determine how its unification through web delivery in apps by companies such as Nervous Systems, has effectively transformed consumers into designers. Parallel investigations explore the work of jewellery artists such as Ted Noten and Christoph Zellweger who have exploited CAD/CAM to mass produce works that democratise consumption through lower purchase prices. The presentation concludes by summarising the key differences and similarities between the artistic use of CAD/CAM in jewellery, with those of its more commercial and design orientated counterparts. It determines the relative shifts over time in both parties respective roles since the inception of digital technologies, identifying convergences and...
Gabriella Arrigoni, Teresa Almeida, David Chatting, Tom Schofield, Annika Haas, Ben Freeth, Diego Trujillo-Pisanty,

Gabriella Arrigoni, Teresa Almeida, David Chatting, Tom Schofield, Annika Haas, Ben Freeth, Diego Trujillo-Pisanty,

Betagrams: Maker Culture and the Aesthetics of Prototyping Gabriella Arrigoni, Teresa Almeida, David Chatting, Tom Schofield, Annika Haas, Ben Freeth, Diego Trujillo-Pisanty, Affiliation: Culture Lab (Newcastle University), Berlin University of the Arts. Keywords: prototype, aesthetic, materiality Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Project summary: Maker culture and the convergence of digital technologies and DIY approaches to fabrication are imbricated with a reform in art practices, particularly for what concerns works produced in media labs, research institutions or hackathons. These works tend to be released in the public realm in non-stable versions, only partially working or assembled without any particular effort in achieving polished exhibition standards. Additionally they carry the expectations for others to contribute to further development, adaptation or customisation, whereas the priority for their creators is in the process and the outcomes of a series of iterations and experimentations. Against this background, the paper suggests the notion of the prototype as an aesthetic paradigm to understand a significant portion of current artistic production. The underlying implication is that provisionality, open-endedness, collaborative implementation, and projection into the future are features belonging to the work not just as a phase in the making process, but also after its encounter with the public. A study was carried out on a curatorial project displaying artworks developed in the same research lab and that together constitute a non exhaustive taxonomy of features and affordances of prototyping. The works embraces an aesthetic of making and crafts not only by adopting cardboard, textiles, found elements but also an explicitly visible infrastructure as main materials. These materials and the processes they are associated with resonate with notions...