< Back to all contributors
Jason Cleverly

Jason Cleverly

The Enlightened Eye Jason Cleverly Affiliation: Autonomatic, Falmouth University Key words: Innovation, Making, Materials Conference Activity: Exhibit in the Exchange Building Project summary: This research is concerned with a growing interest amongst artists, curators and designers, in devising new multimedia assemblies to enhance engagement with museum collections. These initiatives reveal a commitment to creating new opportunities for visitor participation and learning, and for artists and designers to generate and address interpretation in distinctive and novel formats. The Enlightened Eye is a museum interactive designed to enhance visitor experience of mineral specimens. The Enlightened Eye supports a system of planetary gears allowing mineral samples to be examined sequentially by a digital microscope. Using a touch screen and a specially designed interface, visitors can annotate and select close up views to make unique responses that can be shared online. The seeming archaic technology and the kinetic machine styling is an evocation of the camera obscura and the orrery. The manual controls are positioned to encourage visitors to cooperate, engender collaboration and enhance participation. These considerations conform to a programme of aesthetic design and affordance, aimed to support memorable interactions and meaning making. Additionally by inviting virtual and material inspection and response, the Enlightened Eye aims to enhance the objects under scrutiny. CIOLFI, L. 2012. ‘Particpation and the creation of shared heritage’. In Elisa Giaccardi (ed.). Heritage and Social Media : Understanding Heritage in a Participatory Culture. (1st edn). New York, NY: Routledge, 69. HEATH, C. et al. 2002. ‘Crafting participation: designing ecologies, configuring experience’. Visual Communication., 1(1), 9-33. HOOPER-GREENHILL, Eilean. 1994. Museums and their Visitors. London: Routledge. One question that arises...
Anthony Quinn, Emily Clare Thorn, Steve Benford, Boriana Koleva, Richard Mortier

Anthony Quinn, Emily Clare Thorn, Steve Benford, Boriana Koleva, Richard Mortier

We are all programmers now! The hand crafting of visual recognition codes. Anthony Quinn, Emily Clare Thorn, Prof Steve Benford, Prof Boriana Koleva, Prof Richard Mortier Affiliation: University of Nottingham, Central Saint Martins, Aestheticodes Limited Key words: Creativity, Interaction, Design Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Demonstration Fri 11th July Project summary: Aestheticodes is a new image recognition system that is based on the act of drawing. The transition from computer generated QR codes to a more aesthetically pleasing hand crafted aestheticode presents an exciting opportunity though not without some challenges of interacting with such patterns. Images can be encoded by following a simple set of drawing rules that enable an interaction using a smart phone. The aestheticodes system makes the generation of human computer interaction more unique, more playful, more crafted and more human. This Paper will explore the idea of designing beautiful imagery and decorative patterns that contain multiple visual codes. It will document the iterative design process, wherein the designers learned to work with and creatively exploit the technology, enriching their patterns with embellishments and backgrounds and developing strategies for embedding codes into complex designs. We argue for a transition from designing ‘codes to patterns’ that reflects the skills of designers alongside the development of new technologies and new image recognition possibilities. The paper will present future potentials for the application of aestheticodes and raise questions around the implementation of aestheticodes in the real world. The aestheticodes team will also provide a demonstration of the technology wherein participants will learn to ‘program’ their own aestheticode. References: Meese R, Ali S, Thorne E, Benford S, Quinn A,...
Bettina Nissen

Bettina Nissen

Growing Artefacts out of Making Bettina Nissen Affiliation: PhD Candidate, Culture Lab, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne Keywords: embodied craft, making materialisation, reflective fabrication Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Project summary: In this paper I am presenting a speculative exploration into materialisations of digitally captured craft gestures as evocative artefacts. I am discussing initial findings and early experiments of a design-led case study capturing and translating transient movements of crochet practitioners into material traces of the making process. The skilled process of craft is an active and embodied engagement with materials. As Ingold (2013) stresses, a person’s involvement in the organic making process of an object is essential to creating more meaningful connections. He goes further to state that “I want to think of making […] as a process of growth”(Ingold 2013: p.21), hence focusing on the natural relationship between making and meaning. With this in mind, my research is exploring the relationship between the experience of making, the meaning of material artefacts and digital fabrication as tool for reflection. Maker culture and craft practice is a growing area of interest in HCI research. As shown by Rosner et al. (2009), digital technology can be used to augment and annotate artefacts in order to elicit reflection on craft practice and encourage communication. Further technological advances in movement capture allow recording of additional facets of the embodied making process, which are often documented via video and pictorial representations only. In this case study, gestural aspects of the making process were recorded digitally and translated into physical traces as “provocations to thought” (Turkle 2007: p.5) in order to facilitate communication and reflection....
Mhairi Maxwell, Jennifer Gray

Mhairi Maxwell, Jennifer Gray

Design-Archaeology: Bringing a Pictish inspired drinking horn fitting to life Mhairi Maxwell and Jennifer Gray Affiliation: Glasgow School of Art and Edinburgh College of Art Conference Activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Keywords: Authenticity, Recreation, Design-Archaeology Project Summary: The Glenmorangie Early Medieval Research Project recreated objects from the period c.300-900AD in collaboration with artists, designers and makers. Contemporary skills and traditional craft were used, informed directly from the archaeological evidence. This process of recreation has allowed us to experience these ancient objects as new, giving us insights into how they were made, experienced and used. This paper will present the collaborative processes involved in the latest recreation of a silver terminal fitting for a large drinking horn with Researchers and Curators Mhairi Maxwell and Martin Goldberg, and Designer and Maker Jennifer Gray. Digital design and modelling processes were blended with traditional hand making techniques to recreate the silver zoomorphic fitting. The final piece was displayed as a ‘work in progress’ (illustrating its conception from 3D modelling and printing through to the final silver cast object) in the National Museum of Scotland’s Creative Spirit exhibition. Our design-archaeology approach towards material culture allows for a new way to re-evaluate Early Medieval insular art. Jennifer Gray’s work connects the innovative and traditional methods of recreation used by the Glenmorangie Research Project; there has always been a tension between authentic craft techniques available to the Early Medieval people and new technologies available to us today. In this paper we will negotiate questions of authenticity, transparency and creativity that were raised by our particular collaborative approach to recreation. The process of designing and making has...
Rachel Clarke, Paul Dunphy

Rachel Clarke, Paul Dunphy

Photo-parshiya: Crafting and sharing cultural heritage in an international women’s centre Rachel Clarke & Paul Dunphy Affiliation: Digital Interaction at Culture Lab, Newcastle University Keywords: Presentation, Exhibit, photo-sharing Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project Summary: Parshiya is an ancient word that means to participate in a group, family, community, or collective. The photo-parshiya is an enhanced object, a digital photo-album designed to support the sharing of cultural heritage, designed with staff and learners at the Angelou Centre, an international women’s centre in the North East of England. The photo-parshiya can be held like a book and is portable or can be docked as a double touch screen tablet display on a bespoke crafted wooden base. The artefact has been developed through interdisciplinary collaborative practice involving an artist ethnographer, interaction designer, programmer, engineer and furniture designers in response to long-term digital creative media and DIY craft workshops with learners and staff. Women who come to the Centre have made individually designed necklaces enabling reflection and discussion on aspects of identity and cultural heritage. The necklaces are networked with the tablet displays to create personalized photo-collections and have been used to accompany workshops exploring cultural heritage, transnational migration and trade. In using the photo-parshiya in workshops, many women have described how this has supported greater feelings of pride, confidence and curiosity in working with digital technology to curate and share photographs of fulfilling life experiences and achievements. This has further enabled the building of new relationships with friends while supporting existing intergenerational family negotiations around technology use in the home. The process of making and using the artefact...
Victoria Bradbury

Victoria Bradbury

Witch Pricker Victoria Bradbury Affiliation: CRUMB, University of Sunderland, Attaya Projects Key words: code, performativity, witchcraft Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Project Summary: In Witch Pricker, a visitor is confronted with a series of hand-felted wool strawberries extending from a wall. On a central pedestal sits a button, a pin, and a receipt printer. A visitor begins their interaction by pressing the button, triggering a randomization of each strawberry’s “guilt” or “innocence”. A recorded voice instructs the participant to use the pin to prick each strawberry under her petticoat. As each fruit is pricked, a sound indicates whether or not that strawberry is a “witch”. The number of witches found is tallied by the code and a printed receipt indicates the final total. Code and object are central to Witch Pricker as together they determine and manage the interaction. The gesture of the prick begins a feedback loop in the mind of the participant while the loop in the code is answered: If (strawberry x is pricked) { witchCount++; } While humans are capable of very complex reaction, code is scripted, with every possibility pre-determined. In composing code, an artist-programmer must consider how it will affect a participant’s performativity in the space. An installation with custom objects must include instruction (visual, auditory or text-based) for a participant to use bodily learning to engage with an unusual interface.In code-based installation, the programme is magnified when it is woven into the complex capabilities of mind, body, and gesture. References: Cox, G. and McLean, A. (2013). Speaking code. 1st ed. Cambridge, Mass.: The MIT Press. Essinger, J. (2004). Jacquard’s web. 1st...