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Katie Bunnell

Katie Bunnell

Katie Bunnell, All Makers Now? Conference Convenor and Chair for Materiality and Aesthetics Affiliation: Autonomatic Falmouth University Key words: materiality and aesthetics, design practices, democratising technology Biog: Katie Bunnell is a ceramic designer-maker, researcher and leader of the Autonomatic research group at Falmouth University. Katie has an MA in Ceramics and Glass from the Royal College of Art and completed a practice based PhD, “Integrating New Technologies into Ceramic Designer-Maker Practice” in 1998 and founded Autonomatic in 2003. Since then the group have established a reputation for practice-based research that explores the relationships between digital technologies and craft practices. The group consists of practitioner-researchers working in ceramics, metals, glass, textiles, wood and mixed media whose research is focussed on developing specialist digital craft skills and driven by the interests and needs of practices in the UK craft and designer-maker sector. Their work highlights the importance of specialist, high quality, small-scale production within the wider Digital Economy, creating a bridge between 20th century craft practices and 21st century manufacturing. The work of the group has featured in international public exhibitions and lectures, won significant national awards and prizes and influenced policy in the craft sector over the last 10 years. In 2013 HRH Prince Charles presented Autonomatic with the Craft Skills Spotlight Award in recognition of important work being done in digital skills across the sector. Their unique, open exploratory and hands on approach to working with digital tools has resulted in innovative processes and products and enabled them to develop new forms of collaborative and interdisciplinary...
Katie Bunnell

Katie Bunnell

Katie Bunnell, Andrew Smith and Oliver Hatfield Affiliation: Autonomatic, Falmouth University Key words: DIY CNC Tools, Expressive Mark Making, Ceramics Conference Activity: Workshop Friday 11th July Project summary: The Super Slip-Pi (sometimes affectionately known as the Toftomatic amongst ceramicists) is a digitally networked, computer numerically controlled machine for ceramic surface pattern decoration. Employing a Raspberry Pi, Arduino and Tiny G, Super Slip-Pi is a low cost digital system designed to provide an inspiring demonstration of the ways in which the internet and digital production can come together as part of a distributed production chain for artisan ceramics. The machine incorporates a digital  interface that enables users to create and upload imagery remotely via the web and aims to facilitate playful engagement in the production of ceramic tile designs. As a work in progress we invite conference participants to have a go and contribute their responses to it. So come to play! One question that arises from your project: What do Craft practitioners have to contribute to the development of digital tools and...
Hannah Maughan

Hannah Maughan

Hannah Maughan, All Makers Now? Conference Chair Affiliation: Falmouth University Key words:  Design, Embroidery, Community Conference Activity: Chair, Digital Making in Textiles, Thurs 10th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Hannah is a textile designer specialising in embroidery and mixed media. Her work ranges from the couture to the commercial and is represented by View Studio in London, with regular international sales to a variety of leading design companies within the fashion and interior industries. Since 2003 Hannah has worked as senior lecturer on the Textile Design programme, establishing the mixed media area. This focuses on engaging the students in the traditions and values of hand, machine stitch and fabric manipulation, with the emphasis on technical acumen and creative response to personalise and contemporise the discipline. This is also the ethos of her own research work which is currently focusing on digital embroidery. Hannah was a key player in establishing Hidden Art Cornwall at Falmouth, the first and only social franchise of the award winning designer-maker membership organisation, Hidden Art, which connected the Cornish creative design community to each other and the international design community and ran until 2009. In 2011 Hannah received the Falmouth Teaching Excellence Award, created by the institution to recognise exceptionally high quality teaching. This was in recognition of her overall engagement and commitment to her subject area and students.  This contribution was recognised nationally this year when Hannah was shortlisted for the Embroiderers’ Guild inaugural Beryl Dean Award for Teaching Excellence. For All Makers Now? Hannah will be chairing a session on Thurs pm on Digital Making in Textiles and exhibiting some of her...
Aaron Moore

Aaron Moore

Weave Side Table Aaron Moore, Independent Designer-Maker Conference activity: Pop Up Exhibition, Trelissick House Keywords: digital craft, furniture, open design. One of my areas of interest is the democratisation of design and manufacturing. My aim is to design objects and processes that enable small scale manufacturing to take place at a local level in order to reduce the carbon footprint of product distribution and empower and enable communities to become more self sufficient. I use a low cost self-made 3-axis CNC router, combined with open source software to make wooden components for furniture and household goods. A three axis machine however, is really only capable of producing 2 dimensional objects from flat sheets of material which have to ‘jigsaw’ together to become 3 dimensional. Like an origamist turning a flat sheet of paper into a representation of a 3 dimensional object, a great deal of skill is used but the paper is always present. As a consequence I have been exploring how the addition of a fourth rotary axis can change the aesthetic. In terms of technical complexity, adding a rotary axis to a 3 axis machine is relatively simple, and therefore still accessible to digital craft workers. It allows the machine to be used more like a lathe to shape all sides of the work-piece. The table exhibited is the result of an exploration of the capabilities afforded by the new axis and an interest in self-supporting structures i.e. those that are held together with no fixings other than the tension and compression forces within the structure itself. The interlocking components require very few manufacturing processes and only...
Barney Townsend

Barney Townsend

Barney Townsend Affiliation: London South Bank University, Royal College of Art Keywords: 3D Printing, Open Source, Project-based Learning  Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project Summary: Following the expiration of the patents on the FDM 3D printing process some years ago, a significant market for open 3D printers emerged, fuelling popular media claims that one might be found in every home before long. Anderson (2012) hails a new era of democratized innovation that these (and other) digital technologies will enable. The domestic printers, however, are not necessarily the utopian home fabrication tool that the hype might lead us to believe. They require considerable technical skills to assemble and operate, and on-going maintenance and adjustment to both hardware and software in order to keep them operating effectively. The organic and changing nature of the open 3d printer movement means that the hardware often outgrows the literature and learning resources that are available, making the assembly and operating process a complex and sometimes frustrating task for the new user. This paper will document the challenges and opportunities for innovation presented by the process of building an open source 3D printer from the perspective of 2nd year BSc students of Engineering Product Design at the author’s institution. The project was designed to explore the learning experience that a self-directed technical assembly and design project can offer to students, and by extension, to other user groups and makers as well.  In addition to the insights that might be gained into the Open Source and Maker Movement paradigms, the detailed understanding of 3D printing technology, and the associated technical skills,...
Angharad Thomas

Angharad Thomas

The Glove Project Dr Angharad Thomas Affiliation: The Knitting and Crochet Guild, UK Keywords: Making, designing, skill Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July, Workshop Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project summary: The Glove Project includes design, making, blogging and historical research, resulting in the production of about 20 pairs of hand knitted gloves, alongside sketchbooks, interviews and conference papers. The gloves are made by hand, but the project relies on electronic and digital technologies, some examples being: Sourcing patterns, materials and historic examples on line Sourcing information and advice has been facilitated through Ravelry, the wiki for knitters and crocheters The knittingloves blog, documents progress and connects to other knitters. The design philosophy underpinning this project draws its inspiration from makers and design thinkers, primarily Eva Zeisel, with her roots in production ceramics and Anni Albers whose Modernist stance informed her woven textiles. David Pye’s conceptualisations of workmanship, as those of certainty and risk are also relevant. Knitting has been at the forefront of the making movement, said to be a response to the 9/11 attacks in New York in 2001, as the ultimate comfort activity. This has been largely led by self taught knitters who use web tools, such as Ravelry and YouTube to learn, teach and refine new techniques and increase skill levels. The use of these tools has enabled them to establish themselves as significant figures in the knitting landscape with little or no formal design education. Much information on the making process is shared through blogs, Ravelry and Twitter. In response to the growth of knitting and other crafts, small producers of all...
Rebecca Taylor

Rebecca Taylor

Becoming a Culture of Digi-Makers: Curiosity, Creative Confidence and Imagination at Technology Faires Rebecca Taylor Affiliation: HighWire, Lancaster University, Shrimping.It Keywords: Digi-Makers, Creative Confidence, Values-Led Participatory Design Conference Activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Project Summary: If technology faires are inspiring and nurturing a culture of digi-makers (Fuad-Luke, A. 2009) this exploratory study asks how is our creative confidence being challenged as we face and engage in becoming a culture of Digi-Makers? Reflecting on the context of the Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths Network (STEMNet) and the first of its kind, iTECH Design Your Future event hosted by the Museum of Science and Industry (MoSI) in Manchester, March 2014, this fast paced and highly interactive event format offers participants an engaging and informal learning environment. Drawing on a collaborative experiment titled ‘The Invention of Things’, two activities were facilitated by The Curiosity Bureau and Shrimping.It. The inventions made by the participants during their involvement with the Imagination Studio have prompted further areas of inquiry into technology faires such as; how is creative confidence (T. Kelley & D. Kelly 2013) encouraged? How can values-led participatory design (Iversena, O. 2012) be applied to the invention of electronic devices? Why does there appear to be a struggle by students curious of technology to imagine and to think beyond the cues of the facilitator References: Fuad-Luke, A. 2009. ‘Re-crafting capitalism, regenerating societies: How do designer-makers amplify, build and regenerate social capital?’ Paper presented at Making Futures, Plymouth College of Art, 17-18 September 2009. Iversena, O., Halskova, K. and Leong, T. 2012. ‘Values-led participatory design’, CoDesign. Vol. 8, Nos. 2–3, June–September 2012, 87–103. Taylor & Francis....
Michael Shorter, Jon Rogers, Dr John McGhee, Erika Shorter

Michael Shorter, Jon Rogers, Dr John McGhee, Erika Shorter

A Craft Technologist’s Approach Towards Printed Electronics Michael Shorter, Professor Jon Rogers, Dr John McGhee, Erika Shorter. Affiliation: Eclectric Research Studio, University of Dundee, 3D Visualisation Aesthetics Lab, University of New South Wales Keywords: Craft, Technology, Reflection. Conference activity: Presentation/exhibit Project Summary: This paper opens a conversation around what printed electronics are and how a craft technologist would use craft process values such as reflection and an understanding of materiality while navigating this emerging technology. The outcome of exploring printed electronics through a craft technologist’s lens is paper circuitry: an affordable and accessible take on printed electronics that is informed by craft process. Justin Marshall explores the role of technology as a craft tool in Craft and Technology from a Pragmatic Perspective [2]. While technology typically influences craft, this paper will invert the ratio. How can craft processes help to develop printed electronics technology, and by extension other emerging technologies?  References: Coelho, M., Hall, L., Berzowska, J., Maes, P. (2009), Pulp-based computing: a framework for building computers out of paper, in: Proceedings of the 27th International Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, Boston, MA, USA, pp. 3527–3528. Marshall, J. (2002), Craft and Technology from a Pragmatic Perspective. Presented at Craft in the 21st Century, Edinburgh. (www.autonomatic.org.uk/archive/team/jm/JMcraft-techpaper.pdf) Schön, D.A. (2003), The reflective practitioner : how professionals think in action. Ashgate, Aldershot. A question that arises from your project: How can a Craft Technologist democratise emerging technology? Full paper: Shorter, M., Rogers, J., McGhee, J., & Shorter, E. (2014), A Craft Technologist’s Approach Towards Printed Electronics. In K. Bunnell & J. Marshall (Eds.), All Makers Now: Craft Values...
Philip Robbins, Keith Doyle, Emily Carr, Helene Day-Fraser

Philip Robbins, Keith Doyle, Emily Carr, Helene Day-Fraser

Material Matters: Hybridizing emergent digital methodologies across legacy creation ecosystems Philip Robbins, Keith Doyle and Helene Day-Fraser   Affiliation: Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Vancouver, Canada Keywords: 3D printing, legacy process, effective integration Conference Activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Project Summary: Material Matters – a research cluster at Emily Carr University of Art+Design – is exploring new digital production technologies as an analogue to traditional methods and material production. The Prototyping+Media+Programming (PMP) Studio at Emily Carr, which supports Material Matters, offers a wide spectrum of 3D production technologies that showcase a variety of gateways to technology uptake. The Material Matters research cluster is actively engaged in faculty–led creative research, applied partnerships, and outreach, each approaching unique and appropriate solutions through the exploration of additive manufacturing means and methods. As 3D production technologies become less expensive, more powerful and more pervasive they emerge into wider and wider ranges of opportunity. As new digital pathways to creative production develop they intersect with established practice – Material Matters is centered at these points of contact. 3D printing is a digital production technology experiencing explosive growth; a proliferation of applications and technologies is multiplying across a very broad spectrum of creative activity. As the technology matures and disseminates, avenues for innovation multiply as the 3D printing ecosystem grows and diversifies. Material Matters is examining a diversity of conceptually interlinked inquiries framed by this new production platform. We are developing alternate workflows to object making that conflates the digital opportunity with the inherent strengths of legacy processes. Conceived as symbiotic methods – rather than discreet, self-contained systems – Material Matters is examining how...
Isabelle Risner

Isabelle Risner

Understanding the digital proposition: from productive autonomy to collaborative practice. Dr. Isabelle Risner Affiliation: Autonomatic, Falmouth University Keywords: Collaboration, skill, digital craft practice. Conference Activity: Presentation Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project Summary: This paper draws on research undertaken for the author’s PhD, awarded in May 2013 and titled: The Integration of Digital Technologies into Designer-Maker Practice: a Study of Access, Attitudes and Implications. This research found that a cross-fertilisation between craft and digital technologies produces a hybrid networked practice that can amount to a new type of technology-enabled and networked craft – Technepractice – in which ‘negotiated collective engagement’ is the driving characteristic. This presents a fundamental challenge to the constructed authenticity of productive autonomy in 20th century studio craft practice. The animation of collective resources, from exteriorised skill embedded in technology to the expertise of technicians and machine operators and the use of digital data sources, requires a re-evaluation of the location and meaning of skill in digital craft practice. This paper explores the digital practice potential identified through research with makers and suggests a framework for locating craft skill in collaborative practice. The research is underpinned by an understanding of ‘collaborative value chains’ a concept demonstrated by reference to current research undertaken for the Supercrafted project*. Supercrafted is a two year research project at Falmouth University, exploring and developing online digital interaction of benefit to craft practitioners and stakeholders in the craft value chain, including audiences, customers, makers and suppliers. This research seeks to demonstrate the potential for internet-based collaborative value to be harnessed by makers for marketing and communicating with customers, as...
Amanda Ravetz

Amanda Ravetz

Entry: Digital objects and the (dis)placement of knowledge Amanda Ravetz  Affiliation: Manchester School of Art, MIRIAD Keywords: craft, film, displaced knowledge Conference Activity: Presentation Fri 11th July Project Summary: New digital technologies and networks offer an unrivalled opportunity to communicate with others. But these same technologies also allow for “the transfer of this knowledge out of the domain in which it is generated.” (Leach 2012). What are the ethical and social implications for craft of this transfer of knowledge, particularly given craft’s long history of bodily intelligence, which traditionally makes it resistant to abstraction and transfer? This question arises from a project that in transferring knowledge from a ‘real’ domain to a ‘virtual’ one via a digital film and digital platforms, produced two very different responses from the communities involved – those who were filmed and the those involved in filming. Entry was made during a three and a half week research residency in Dhal ni Pol, one of 600 pols located in the old city of Ahmedabad. It depicts a playful community-focused response to a small doorway decorated with ceramic flowers placed in a public space. In Entry we witness the everyday aesthetics of this part of Ahmedebad’s old city: a mother gently oiling the hair of the child, a group of children spontaneously breaking into a garba, a trademark cycle decorated with garlands. Once uploaded to digital platforms and sent around the world, the film effectively abstracted knowledge – including everyday craft knowledge – from the relationships in which it was normally embedded. While this represents a good fit with the (Euro-American) idea of knowledge as something whose...
Emma Posey

Emma Posey

From Consumer to Producer of Technology with Technocamps Dr Emma Posey, Technocamps, Aberystwyth University Keywords: young people, producers, making Conference Activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Project Summary: Technocamps is a partnership project between the Universities of Swansea, Aberystwyth, Bangor and South Wales that inspires young people aged 11-19 to attend workshops on a range of computing-based topics. A key focus of Technocamps is DIY technology – enabling young people to move from a consumer to producer of technology. The Aberystwyth hub is very focused on out-of-the-box computing and working with technology away from the usual keyboard and screen. Young people enjoy hacking their way into existing tools and hardware. Knowing that they have the expertise to take something apart, modify it or build it gives young people a real confidence. Using environments where young people are regular consumers provides us with an opportunity to quickly engage with young people in production. For instance, Minecraft has been a hugely popular online environment where participants can build with others online and we have been teaching coding using Minecraft Pi (on the Raspberry Pi) as well as working with Paul Harter, Printcraft, where young people can 3D print their Minecraft creations. I will present some of the workshops and resources Technocamps has developed with creative technologists and share some of the lesson’s learnt. Within the light of rapid developments in the Computer Science curriculum in England I will also explore how programmes of study within schools could be more cross-disciplinary. For instance, merging Computer Science with Design and Technology as well as Art. In conclusion, I will argue that encouraging young people...
Chamithri Greru, Dr Britta Kalkreuter

Chamithri Greru, Dr Britta Kalkreuter

Match making: Broadening cultural exchange opportunities through digital access to crafts. Chamithri Greru and Britta Kalkreuter Affiliation: Heriot Watt University, Scotland Keywords: cross-cultures, digital- engagements, craft Conference activity: Presentation Fri 11th July Project Summary: There is a growing interest in cross-cultural exchanges between practitioners (Ravetz et al. 2013). However, even in this climate keen on cultural immersion, creating effective and meaningful engagements remains a challenging enterprise, and critics have posited that ‘craft is not straightforwardly democratic’ (ibid). Could technology’s ever rising accessibility thus be the answer for equalising the playing field for cultural exchange, opening opportunities for creative engagements irrespective of distance and mobility? The paper explores how we might transpose the characteristics of meaningful cultural exchange into a digital environment. By exploring digital potential within a cross cultural residency (ReSIde) funded by Creative Scotland in 2012/3, it questions what the digital equivalent of immersing oneself in other cultures might be, and what possibilities for collaborative creation there are at a distance. Thus it seeks to define what the 21st century digital making cultures might be calling for. As international residencies are resource and time intensive, thus largely benefiting the chosen few, this paper investigates how digital platforms can create sustainable knowledge communities, resulting in knowledge mobility that is frequent and economic. A specific focus of analogue making cultures, witnessed during the ReSIde residency by practitioners of both traditional and contemporary making was found to be the use of ‘appresentation’ (Moon 2004). We are debating to what extend this method of creating meaningful experiences is adaptable, congenial and appropriate for the digital environment, focusing particularly on social networking platforms...
Tavs Jorgensen

Tavs Jorgensen

‘Orbit’ series of glass Bowls Tavs Jorgensen, tavs.jorgensen@falmouth.ac.uk Affiliation: Falmouth University Keywords: Tool Making, Reconfigurable Pin Tooling, Glass Slumping. Conference activity: Pop Up Exhibition, Trelissick House Project Summary: This conference contribution is an exhibition of a series of glass bowls. These bowls are part of the output from the author’s investigation into a flexible tooling concept known as Reconfigurable Pin Tooling (RPT) and the ‘Orbit’ series is the result from a new phase in the author’s creative exploration of RPT. Pervious investigations have explored ‘free-form’ aesthetics in the glass pieces produced via this tooling concept. This new cycle of investigation is intended to provide evidence for the versatility of the RPT concept by the creation of pieces with a contrasting aesthetic based on more formal geometries. The author’s interest in the RPT concept has resulted in the development of several bespoke systems for various application and materials. The particular RPT system used for creating glass bowls is circular in shape and through the Orbit series the author seeks to explore this underlying geometry as an integral part of the aesthetics of the pieces. The bowls are created by using a ‘free fall slumping’ technique (Cummings, 2001) with the pieces being produced by heating glass disks and letting gravity force the glass through a series of apertures which have been created by positioning pins in concentric circles in a RPT device. The Bowls have been designed to balance at an angle to further highlight the evidence of the circular orbits of pins. The wider context for this research concerns notions of tool making and technology driven innovation. More specifically it...
Lucie Hernandez, Edwin Love

Lucie Hernandez, Edwin Love

Crafting Data Stories Lucie Hernandez & Edwin Love Affiliation: University of West London Keywords: Craft, Tangible, Data Conference activity: Workshop/Demonstration Fri 11th July Project summary: This demonstration will deconstruct a recent piece of research exploring the possibility of making connections between physical, crafted artefacts and graphical data visualisations that are structured around digital information. The work investigates the design of tangible objects as a representation of data, a rendering in physical form. In order to establish whether technological forms may also be crafted. It questions whether the ‘crafting’ implied in the work occurred during the creation of the physical artifact. The tangible nature of the representation relates our experience of mediated communication to a crafted object. The notion of craft practice has expanded to include growing experimentation across media to create hybrid constructions. Craft techniques are now integrating with electronic & digital knowledge, tools and processes to suggest new directions and possibilities. Graphic and tangible pieces may be the product of more than one individual, the result of several skilled people that use their distributed skills to connect otherwise disparate ideas and skills. The work being explored is informed by digital and handmade making practices, emerging hybrid forms and computationally mediated worlds. References: Goldsteijn, C. Van De Hoven, E. Frohlich, D, Sellen, A., 2013. Hybrid Crafting: Towards an Integrated Practice of Crafting with Physical and Digital Components. Personal & Ubiquitous Computing, Springer McCandless, D., 2012. Information is Beautiful. Collins McCullough, M., 1996. Abstracting Craft. MIT Press A question that arises from your project: Can data be crafted in tangible forms to reveal stories or patterns and suggest a multi-sensory dimension? Full...
Fiona Hackney, Mary Loveday Edwards and Hannah Maughan

Fiona Hackney, Mary Loveday Edwards and Hannah Maughan

Community Making & Making Communities: crafting non/digital interactions Fiona Hackney, Mary Loveday Edwards and Hannah Maughan  Affiliation: Falmouth University Keywords: co-design, community, stitch Conference activity: Presentation Fri 11th July, Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project Summary: Millions engage in creative handicrafts, activities that are undertaken voluntarily for pleasure and involve high levels of competence and creativity, representing an important area of community assets that is often devalued or dismissed (Hackney, 2013a). This paper draws on research from the AHRC-funded project Co-creating CARE (Community Asset-based Research and Enterprise) which explores how crafts knowledge might be applied through processes of co-design (engaging all stakeholders), co-creation (collaborative work) and co-discovery (by formal and informal researchers).The project works with community groups and partners in Cornwall, Birmingham and Dublin and uses participatory action research methods in digital fabrication, virtual communication, and face-to-face activities and workshops. CARE initially aimed to explore how craft might work as a bridging activity, bringing disparate groups together to enhance social capital, and a series of short films explored intergenerational skill sharing through creative making (Hackney 2013b). These demonstrated how film can communicate crafts in community settings; the activity also revealed the power relationships embedded in creative exchange, as tensions emerged around, for instance, digital making, suggesting important questions about the future of traditional skills and how these might be productively combined with new technologies (Maughan 2014). To find out more about collective sharing through making research took what we term a ‘material consequences’ approach, embracing playfulness and risk. Participating groups were asked to collaboratively devise ways to capture and reflect on the ‘small stories’ of collaborative interaction through making. The...
Pascal Glissmann, Martina Höfflin

Pascal Glissmann, Martina Höfflin

Electronic life forms Pascal Glissmann, Martina Höfflin Affiliation: Academy of Media Arts Cologne, Parsons The New School for Design Keywords: Electronics, Handcraft, Artificial Life  Conference activity: Pop Up Exhibition Trelissick House Project summary: Electronic-life-forms inhabit the intersection of technology, art & science to explore the shifting transition from smart objects to autonomous subjects through digital and electronic craft. Democratised technology and global accessibility redefine 21st century artistic production. New technologies in combination with the storytelling of artificial life motivated this investigation of the characteristics of life and the way we perceive them. The narratives of Prometheus, Golem and Frankenstein have captivated human beings, and a fascination for high tech robotics, and earlier representations like the Automata of the 18th Century, is ongoing. The Electronic-life-forms project assimilates these ideas combining modern digital production processes with aspects of traditional handcraft into a series of site-specific installations. The work uses a range of materials: solar cells, simple electronic circuits, crafted wires and components, and digitally manufactured circuit boards. Installations are developed through a creative investigative process of material and production entrepreneurship: high-tech digital techniques that demand long term preparations and iterative cycles of prototyping are complemented with remarkable slow and strenuous periods of handcraft. These repetitive, almost lethargic, production phases mirror the core question of the project: what defines a living system and how osmotic is the thin membrane between nature and the artificial today? A question that arises from your project: What defines a living system and how osmotic is the thin membrane between nature and the artificial today?  ...
Katrien Dreessen, Ollivier Piqueray, Jessica Schoffelen, Danny Leen

Katrien Dreessen, Ollivier Piqueray, Jessica Schoffelen, Danny Leen

Great expectations and big challenges: a FabLab as a facilitator for personal fabrication of tools to self-manage diabetes Katrien Dreessen, Ollivier Piqueray, Jessica Schoffelen, Danny Leen Affiliation: Social Spaces, Media, Arts & Design Faculty, LUCA School of Arts/Catholic University Leuven and University Hasselt Conference activity: Presentation Fri 11th July Keywords: FabLab, participatory design, personal fabrication Project summary: This project discusses a FabLab as a research and production environment within the project Bespoke Design. Bespoke Design (www.designopmaat.be/) deals with the participatory design of self-management tools for and together with people with type 1 diabetes. The project explores the role of FabLab Genk (www.fablabgenk.be) for developing these tools and how sharing and documenting the process of these tools enables others, e.g. people with diabetes or designers, to redesign them (Schoffelen, Huybrechts, Dreessen, 2013). Although the context of a FabLab as an open and accessible workshop is very beneficial for the idea of personal fabrication, some important challenges remain. A major obstacle is having the necessity of skills and expertise for using the different machines in a FabLab since lack of these will lead to time and cost consuming trial and error, questioning the relevance of developing personalised tools. For instance, to use a 3D-printer one needs to know how to design for it and have specific knowledge of the characteristics of the material. However, we believe that including FabLab Genk in a participatory approach provides the designer and FabLab expert with a new role in these kinds of design projects, i.e. a mediator between the participant and the machinery. Furthermore, designing in this context expands this mediator-role from conceptual design (exploring problems and possibilities through co-design...
T. Hugh Crawford

T. Hugh Crawford

Wood: Making History/History of Making T. Hugh Crawford Affiliation: Georgia Institute of Technology Keywords: modeling, materiality, traditional Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Project summary: “The Story in Wood”: a story of the acquisition of traditional craft skills inflected by the production of laser-cut and 3d printed models along with larger scaled CNC practices. This project works through two areas of inquiry: (1) an exploration of pedagogy linking history and culture to material practice (both traditional and digital), and (2) research on how the history of traditional materials inflect current research and design, particularly in relation to the technologies found in fabrication labs. Its focus is on the boundary between the history of craft related to contemporary design practices through computer controlled fabrication machines. Its goal is to better understand the complex relationship between people, design, material, and machines that is often elided in digital practice. References: Celani, Gabriela. “Digital Fabrication Laboratories: Pedagogy and Impacts on Architectural Education.” Nexus Network Journal 14.3 (2012): 469-482. Oxman, Rivka, and Robert Oxman. “New structuralism: design, engineering and architectural technologies.” Architectural Design 80.4 (2010): 14-23. A question that arises from your project: How does the history of traditional materials inflect current research and design, particularly in relation to the technologies found in fabrication labs.  ...
Melanie Bowles, Emma Neuberg

Melanie Bowles, Emma Neuberg

Gifts and Occupations – CANCELLED! The People’s Print – Melanie Bowles & Dr Emma Neuberg Affiliation: The People’s Print, TED Textile Environmental Design, The Slow Textiles Group, Textile Futures Research Center, Open Fashion Design Network Keywords: Democratic, digital, textiles Conference activity: Workshop Project summary: The People’s Print invites you to participate in a workshop designed to explore democratic models for textile design employing demonstrations, discussion, activity and dialogue that challenge hierarchical and egocentric models of design. This event works through the breadth of exciting options for the wearer to be at the centre of their design process, During the workshop we will look at the ‘real’ opportunities available for the public to create their own design work focusing on digital print technology, e-learning/commerce systems and expanding online communities. A key focus of the workshop is to address whether the proposed models can act to counter the negative effects of mass consumerism, fast fashion and globalisation by, essentially, investing in people’s innate creativity and giving them the confidence, vision and tools to create bespoke products for themselves and their communities. During the workshop we will offer the participants a ‘hands on’ activity to create artwork and demonstrate the process to create the complete DIY cycle to create, print, make, wear and share. The activity ‘gifts & occupation’ is inspired by the work of educationalist, pedagogue and kindergarten founder Friedrich Froebel and aims to offer a ‘tool box’ for future developments. www.thepeoplesprint.com References: Fletcher, K., 2008, Sustainable Fashion and Textiles: Design Journeys, London: Earthscan. Brosterman, N., 1997. Inventing Kindergarten, New York: Abrams. A question that arises from your project: What might a textile...
Roberta Bernabei

Roberta Bernabei

Digital Jewellery: The Democratisation of Authorship and Ownership Roberta Bernabei – Senior Lecturer in 3D Design, Silversmithing & Jewellery. Affiliation: School of the Arts, Loughborough University Keywords: jewellery, democratisation, CAD/CAM Conference activity: Presentation Fri 11th July Project summary:  This presentation analyses the consequences on the authorship and ownership of contemporary jewellery through computer aided design and manufacture (CAD/CAM). It identifies the ramifications for jewellery design and contemporary jewellery through an examination of the respective roles of the jewellery designer, contemporary jeweller and consumer. The latter focuses on the extent to which individual members of the public can become virtual craftspeople. It therefore aims to ascertain if and how the act of creating jewellery has been democratised through digital manufacture and delivery. A complementary investigation seeks to establish how far CAD/CAM has enabled contemporary jewellers to democratise the consumption of artistic jewellery through a reduction in production costs. Discussions chart CAD’s gradual shift from exclusive use by expert technicians to generic deployment by amateurs manipulating user-friendly and intuitive software. They determine how its unification through web delivery in apps by companies such as Nervous Systems, has effectively transformed consumers into designers. Parallel investigations explore the work of jewellery artists such as Ted Noten and Christoph Zellweger who have exploited CAD/CAM to mass produce works that democratise consumption through lower purchase prices. The presentation concludes by summarising the key differences and similarities between the artistic use of CAD/CAM in jewellery, with those of its more commercial and design orientated counterparts. It determines the relative shifts over time in both parties respective roles since the inception of digital technologies, identifying convergences and...
Gabriella Arrigoni, Teresa Almeida, David Chatting, Tom Schofield, Annika Haas, Ben Freeth, Diego Trujillo-Pisanty,

Gabriella Arrigoni, Teresa Almeida, David Chatting, Tom Schofield, Annika Haas, Ben Freeth, Diego Trujillo-Pisanty,

Betagrams: Maker Culture and the Aesthetics of Prototyping Gabriella Arrigoni, Teresa Almeida, David Chatting, Tom Schofield, Annika Haas, Ben Freeth, Diego Trujillo-Pisanty, Affiliation: Culture Lab (Newcastle University), Berlin University of the Arts. Keywords: prototype, aesthetic, materiality Conference activity: Presentation Thurs 10th July Project summary: Maker culture and the convergence of digital technologies and DIY approaches to fabrication are imbricated with a reform in art practices, particularly for what concerns works produced in media labs, research institutions or hackathons. These works tend to be released in the public realm in non-stable versions, only partially working or assembled without any particular effort in achieving polished exhibition standards. Additionally they carry the expectations for others to contribute to further development, adaptation or customisation, whereas the priority for their creators is in the process and the outcomes of a series of iterations and experimentations. Against this background, the paper suggests the notion of the prototype as an aesthetic paradigm to understand a significant portion of current artistic production. The underlying implication is that provisionality, open-endedness, collaborative implementation, and projection into the future are features belonging to the work not just as a phase in the making process, but also after its encounter with the public. A study was carried out on a curatorial project displaying artworks developed in the same research lab and that together constitute a non exhaustive taxonomy of features and affordances of prototyping. The works embraces an aesthetic of making and crafts not only by adopting cardboard, textiles, found elements but also an explicitly visible infrastructure as main materials. These materials and the processes they are associated with resonate with notions...